COSEWIC 2021 Call for Bids for Status Reports

Experts Are Needed to Write a COSEWIC Status Report

November 17, 2021 – January 5, 2022

Deadline: Wednesday, January 5 at 3pm Eastern time

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Part 1: Introduction

COSEWIC is seeking experts from both the public and private sectors to produce a status report or a designatable unit report. COSEWIC status reports summarize the scientific, community and Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) that is the basis for status determinations. Each report is an up-to-date compilation and analysis of all available biological information concerning a wildlife species’ status in Canada, including its distribution, abundance, habitat availability, and factors or threats limiting the wildlife species. COSEWIC may also identify Designatable Units (DU) below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance. DU reports form the basis of a subsequent assessment for the wildlife species.

Updates to status reports for wildlife species that have existing COSEWIC designations may draw on information from the previous report(s) and will provide the basis for future updated reports on the wildlife species.

Applicants are asked to submit bids for a contract to produce a status report for the wildlife species from Part 2 below. COSEWIC will only accept bids for single status reports, unless Part 2 specifically asks for bids on more than one wildlife species. For applications submitted by more than one person, the roles of each person in the preparation of the report must be clearly explained, and the names and roles of all persons who will be involved should be included. Note that general or species-specific corrections or clarifications to the Call for Bids may be posted on the COSEWIC website; applicants should check the website for updates until the close of the Call for Bids. For instructions on how to submit a bid and for information about the conditions and requirements involved, please see Part 3 below.

The wildlife species for which a status report will be commissioned is shown in Part 2 below. The year of designation and the current COSEWIC risk category are indicated. The suggested value of the contract is provided as a guide for applicants in developing their proposals. The number of designatable units planned for inclusion in a status report is based on best available information. It should be noted that the number of designatable units in a status report can change leading up to the letting of a contract and/or once a contract is underway. Information on the COSEWIC designatable guidelines can be found at COSEWIC guidelines for recognizing designatable units.

Note: Any reports commissioned by COSEWIC exceeding $40,000 will be posted on the Government Electronic Tendering Service, and not on a COSEWIC call for bids. Postings on BuyandSell.gc.ca do not necessarily coincide with the posting dates for COSEWIC calls for bids.

There could be delays in awarding and/or decisions not to award contracts to members of COSEWIC or its associated subcommittees if there are any concerns with real or perceived conflict of interest.


 

Part 2: Wildlife species for which a COSEWIC status report is needed

November 17, 2021 – January 5, 2022

Deadline: Wednesday, January 5 at 3pm Eastern time

Amphibians

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Gyrinophilus porphyriticus Spring Salamander Adirondack / Appalachian population QC Threatened,
(May 2011)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022

Arthropods

Report writers for all Arthropods reports will need:

  1. for those species that require fieldwork
    1. do or arrange for fieldwork to verify whether the wildlife species as well as suitable habitat are still present at some or all locations from which the wildlife species had been recorded previously,
    2. to check appropriate habitat in an area where the wildlife species may be expected,
    3. to include an appendix documenting the field work including: detailed locality data on sites visited, and survey techniques (this is considered the field report), and
    4. provide material evidence of occurrence, preferably at least one voucher specimen per extant locality deposited in a recognized public institution (e.g., Canadian National Collection, and other entomological collections in the country), or photographic evidence if this can be obtained without undue disturbance;
  2. estimate, if possible, trends in abundance of the wildlife species over ten year time intervals using museum datasets, citizen science data, or other research information. Additional information requirements are specific to species. Note that access to private properties for survey purposes requires landowner permission. Bids will be assessed based on the proposal to fulfill the species-specific information requirements on threats, population, and habitat trends, and to complete fieldwork. Report writers should obtain additional information from the COSEWIC Secretariat. Please see Appendix 1 for updated travel rates and guidelines for information on estimating field expenses.
Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Epeoloides pilosula Macropis Cuckoo Bee NS Endangered,
(May 2011)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022

A ten-year status reassessment of Macropis Cuckoo Bee is required; there is substantial new information since the previous status assessment. New subpopulations have been recorded from Alberta and Manitoba. This cuckoo bee is an obligate social parasite of bees in the genus Macropis, which are themselves specialists of a suite of Yellow-loosestrife species (Lysimachia spp.). Despite recent increases in nationwide bee surveys, it has been found in Canada at only five sites in the past fifty years, and it is restricted to a habitat that may be declining in abundance and quality. The report writer is expected to compile new information, develop a measure for survey effort, and seek additional information from regional specialists, experts, and jurisdictional biologists. Field work is not required, but the report writer is expected to seek out likely sources of additional information within the species current and historical range.

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Hypochlora alba Greenish-white Grasshopper AB, MB, SK Special Concern,
(November 2012)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022

A ten-year reassessment of the Greenish-white Grasshopper is required. This distinctive grasshopper is restricted to dry mixed grass prairie in southernmost Alberta, Saskatchewan and southwestern Manitoba. Most of the Canadian population is found in only a few sites with many sites having very small populations. There is evidence that there has been a decline in the western part of the range. A number of threats have been documented including conversion to tame pasture, pesticide use and overgrazing. Re-establishment of lost populations and rescue effect are limited by the fact that this species is mostly flightless, although some Canadian habitat is continuous across the border. Fieldwork is required to verify a few sites. Compilation of new information, including natural history, threats, new records, and discussion with species specialists is required as part of this report.

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Schinia lucens Leadplant Flower Moth MB New $11,000.00
Fall 2022

Leadplant Flower Moth (Schinia lucens) is found within prairie habitats where their host plants (leadplant/false indigos; Amorpha spp.) co-occur. Canadian records for this moth are primarily historical and restricted to Manitoba. Host plants A. nana and A. fruticosa are also only recorded from Manitoba, though there is a third possible host plant, A. canescens. The moth has one generation per year with a flight period in July and August. Threats may include agricultural pollution, fragmentation of habitat, and natural system modifications such as alterations to fire cycles. The report writer must compile all records, compile past search effort, and categorize threats including any known changes in the distribution of the host plants. Fieldwork that includes both species presence/not detected, and threat categorization, at historical sites and potential habitats is required.

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Oedaleontus enigma Valley Grasshopper BC New $11,000.00
Fall 2022

This grasshopper is associated with arid shrub-steppe in the intermountain west and reaches the northern limit of distributions in the southern Okanagan Valley. The species is known from one site and it was resighted during 2021. It is primarily a forb and shrub feeder and will feed heavily on introduced forbs. The southern Okanagan Valley was sampled extensively via pitfall trapping in the 1990's and 2000's, including in appropriate habitat for this species; no Valley Grasshoppers were found. Land development, the spread of invasive non-native plants and the alteration of fire regimes are threats. The report writer must compile information on all known records, search effort, threats, and potential habitat. The report writer is expected to compile and quantify past and recent search effort, including the null data as well as ascertain current threats. Fieldwork is required in potential habitats to document occurrence.

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $21,000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Amblyscirtes oslari Oslar's Roadside Skipper AB, SK New
Hesperia pahaska Pahaska Skipper MB, SK New
Notamblyscirtes simius Simius Roadside Skipper SK New

These three skippers are found within mixed-grass prairie habitats or open woodland areas in southern AB, SK, and MB. Most Canadian records are historical despite several current records for all three species in the United States. These skippers have one generation in the north and share a common host plant, Blue Grama (Bouteloua gracilis). Perceived threats include impacts of agriculture, resource extraction, fragmentation of habitat, and climate change. The report writer must compile past and present records of occurrence, assess search effort, and categorize threats. They will be required to survey historical and possible locations within the prairie provinces to better determine the current range and status of these skippers. Three separate reports are required under this contract; however, there we expect overlap in threats and habitat trends, and the text can be similar in each report.

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $24,000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Agrotis arenarius Sable Island Cutworm Moth NS New
Apamea sordens sableana Sable Island Bordered Apamea NS New
Eucosma sableana Sable Island Eucosma NS New
Orgyia leucostigma sablensis Sable Island White-marked Tussock Moth NS New
Papaipema sp. Sable Island Borer NS New

Sable Island is an ecologically significant island located 300 km east of Nova Scotia. Five moths are known to be endemic to the island. Three separate COSEWIC reports are required under this contract; however, we expect overlap in threats and habitat trends, and the text can be similar. However threats should consider the specific natural history of each moth and how the threat directly impacts that moth. The first report includes two grass-feeding moths (Sable Island Cutworm Moth [Agrotis arenarius] and Apamea sordens sableana [a moth]); the second status report includes the species that feed on Asteraceae (Sable Island Papaipema (Papaipema n. sp.) and Eucosma sableana [a moth]); and the third status report is specific to the generalist herbivore, Sable Island White-marked Tussock Moth (Orgyia leucostigma sablensis). The status report writer will work with Co-chairs to plan in advance of starting the written reports, to implement a reasonable structure for each of the multi-species’ reports. Fieldwork is required on sand beaches on coastal mainland Nova Scotia for all species below. Parks Canada has been gathering information on these species and threats over the past few years, and communications with parks staff is necessary to ensure all information is collated. Information on each species is as follows:

  1. Sable Island Cutworm Moth, Agrotis arenarius. This species is a Noctuid moth endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The moth has an annual life cycle and is dependent on Ammophila grasses. These grasses are native to coasts of the North Atlantic and are found almost exclusively on the first line of coastal sand dunes, have creeping underground stems or rhizomes allow them to thrive under conditions of shifting sands and high winds, and help to stabilize and prevent coastal erosion. Many species in this genus are of great importance as cutworms, major agricultural pests whose larvae hide by day and emerge at night to feed. Not all species in this genus are agricultural pests.
  2. Eucosma sableana [a moth]. This moth is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The moth presumably has a 1-year life cycle. The larval food plant is unknown. Eucosma sableana is closely related to the widespread species E. ochrocephala, which feeds on cocklebur (Xanthium spp.) as a larva. Xanthium does not occur on Sable Island, but perhaps the food plant is another Asteraceae species. It is noted as being "common at light in August and September".
  3. Sable Island Papaipema (Papaipema n. sp.). This moth is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. It is an undescribed species of Noctuidae. The larval host is unknown, but it may bore the roots and stems of a single Asteraceae like related species. However, the larvae of the sister species on mainland Nova Scotia (P. nelita) bore into stems and roots of the aster Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.). Adult records are from mid-August and mid-September and are attracted to lights. The habitat is unknown but there are limited possibilities (e.g., grassland/herbaceous, sand/dune, shrubland/chaparral) on Sable Island, which is treeless, sandy and dry.
  4. Sable Island White-marked Tussock Moth (Orgyia leucostigma sablensis). This moth is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The species was described as an endemic subspecies of the more widespread, White-marked Tussock Moth, based on collections from Sable Island in the 1970s. Larvae were collected from blueberry, cranberry, iris, bayberry and both grasses and sedges. On the mainland other subspecies of White-marked Tussock Moth larvae feed on a wide variety of plants including both conifers and flowering plants. Adults have been collected from early August into mid-September.
  5. Apamea sordens sableana [a moth]. This Noctuid moth is a subspecies of the wider ranging Apamea sordens and is known in Canada only from Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The larva feeds on various grasses, including oats, fescues, barleys, canary grasses, Timothy and others. This species overwinters as a larva, feeding in mild weather throughout the season.

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $21,000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Ephalus latimanus [a darkling beetle] NS New
Omophron labiatum Large-lipped Sand Beetle NS New
Tricholochmaea sablensis Sable Island Leaf Beetle NS New

Sable Island is an ecologically significant island located 300 km east of Nova Scotia. Three beetles are known to be endemic to the island. Two separate reports are required under this contract. We expect overlap in threats and habitat trends, and the text can be similar. However, threats should consider the specific natural history of each beetle and how the threat directly impacts that beetle. The first status report includes the two beach-dwelling beetles Omophron labiatum [a Carabid beetle] and Ephalus latimanus [a darkling beetle]; and the second status report includes the Sable Island Leaf Beetle (Tricholochmaea sablensis). The status report writer will work with Co-chairs to plan in advance of starting the written reports, to implement a reasonable structure for each of the multi-species’ reports. Fieldwork is required on sand beaches on coastal mainland Nova Scotia for all species below. Parks Canada has been gathering information on these species and threats over the past few years, and communications with parks staff is necessary to ensure all information is collated. Information on each species is as follows:

  1. Omophron labiatum [a Carabid beetle]. This beetle is only known in Canada from Sable Island and is disjunct from the nearest known populations in New England and Massachusetts. The species occurs in open, sandy, and usually damp ground along the coastal zone, from sea beaches inland to altitudes up to about 275 m, as well as saline beaches or on the bare shores of ponds, lakes ,and rivers. The species is nocturnal, and adults appear to be gregarious, so it is often found in large numbers where it occurs.
  2. Ephalus latimanus [a darkling beetle]. This flightless beetle is known in Canada only from Sable Island, Nova Scotia and is perhaps an ice age relict from the Georges Bank refugia. Elsewhere it ranges on coastal dunes on the US Atlantic seaboard from New Jersey to Maine. This species is a common nocturnal species on sand dunes throughout its range. The species lives in loose sand and leaf litter around the roots and at the base of plants such as sea rocket, Cakile edentula (Brassicaceae), and seaside goldenrod, Solidago sempervirens (Asteraceae).
  3. Sable Island Leaf Beetle (Tricholochmaea sablensis). This species appears to be a post-glacial relict species found only on Sable Island, Nova Scotia. It has been collected from bog cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), which is restricted to a cranberry bog near a small freshwater lake on Sable Island. The lake, which had a salinity of 25 ppm was less saline than any of the surrounding lakes. Collecting on Sable Island in 1976-77 and 1989 failed to find any on Sable Island and recent work in 2004 has also failed to turn up any specimens, casting some doubt on whether the species is still extant.

Birds

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $15,000.00, Winter 2022/2023

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Accipiter gentilis atricapillus Northern Goshawk AB, BC, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT Not at Risk,
(April 1995)
Accipiter gentilis laingi Northern Goshawk BC Threatened,
(May 2013)

Two Designatable Units of Northern Goshawk are currently recognised by COSEWIC, which align with the distributions of the laingi and atricapillus subspecies in Canada. However, the number and delineation of Designatable Units in Canada are presently being reviewed by COSEWIC, and will be finalized in April 2022. It is anticipated that two or three Designatable Units will be recognised, and that these may not align directly with those considered in past status reports. The status report produced through this contract will consider the status of all resulting Northern Goshawk Designatable Units within Canada, as identified by COSEWIC in April 2022.

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Bubo scandiacus Snowy Owl AB, BC, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT Not at Risk,
(April 1995)
$13,000.00
Fall 2022
Setophaga kirtlandii Kirtland's Warbler ON, QC Endangered,
(April 2008)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022
Melanerpes lewis Lewis's Woodpecker BC Threatened,
(April 2010)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022
Vermivora chrysoptera Golden-winged Warbler MB, ON, QC, SK Threatened,
(April 2006)
$8,000.00
Fall 2022

A draft provisional update status report was prepared for Golden-Winged Warbler under contract in 2016. Further work was then put on hold until status-related implications of recent research into population genetics and taxonomy of Golden-Winged and Blue-winged Warblers were better understood. This draft provisional report will be provided to the contractor as a starting point for this contract, thereby reducing the number of review periods required and resulting in a shorter contract period.

Freshwater Fishes

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $20,000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Acipenser transmontanus* White Sturgeon Upper Fraser River population BC Endangered,
(November 2012)
Acipenser transmontanus* White Sturgeon Upper Columbia River population BC Endangered,
(November 2012)
Acipenser transmontanus* White Sturgeon Lower Fraser River population BC Threatened,
(November 2012)
Acipenser transmontanus* White Sturgeon Upper Kootenay River population BC Endangered,
(November 2012)
Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Catostomus sp. cf. catostomus Salish Sucker BC Threatened,
(November 2012)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022
Cottus confusus** Shorthead Sculpin BC Special Concern,
(November 2010)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022
Opsopoeodus emiliae Pugnose Minnow ON Threatened,
(May 2012)
$10,000.00
Fall 2022

* An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.
** Field work may be required for this species.

Marine Mammals

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $15,000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Balaena mysticetus* Bowhead Whale Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort population NT, NU, YT Special Concern,
(April 2009)
Balaena mysticetus* Bowhead Whale Eastern Canada-West Greenland population Arctic Ocean, NU, QC Special Concern,
(April 2009)

* An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.

Molluscs

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Lampsilis fasciola Wavy-rayed Lampmussel ON Special Concern,
(April 2010)
$8,000.00
Fall 2022
Obovaria olivaria Hickorynut ON, QC Endangered,
(May 2011)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022

Field verification consisting of a targetted SCUBA reconnaissance (i.e., determination of presence/absence) of moderately deep (1–3 m), sandy-bottomed rivers with a known Lake Sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens, likely host fish) population along the north shore of lakes Huron and Superior close to the Mississagi River record is required for Hickorynut (Obovaria olivaria). Discussion with the Molluscs SSC will be required to determine the extent of the reconnaissance; field verification of other previously known occupied sites is not required. A field summary report documenting the field work, including detailed site information and survey methodologies used, is required; photographic vouchers of live specimens also are required for each site as well as the collection of fresh or weathered valves where possible which will need to be deposited in a recognized public institution. The value for field verifications cannot exceed one-third the contract value. Please see Appendix 1 for updated travel rates and guidelines for information on estimating field expenses.

Mosses and Lichens

The report writers for all moss and lichen reports will need to:

  1. do research to discover the known distribution of the species under consideration including information available from herbaria and other applicable sources,
  2. undertake field verification work to check whether the wildlife species, as well as suitable habitat, is still present at sites from which the wildlife species had been recorded previously,
  3. check potential habitat in areas where the wildlife species may be expected,
  4. estimate, the abundance of the wildlife species at each site visited by counting colonies or thalli,
  5. include an appendix documenting the field verification work including detailed locality data on all sites visited (as well as visited sites where the wildlife species was not found)
  6. describe survey techniques, and deposit at least one voucher specimen per extant locality in a recognized public herbarium, or, in the case where collecting specimens could further endanger a population, to provide photographic evidence if this can be obtained without undue disturbance. The value for field verifications cannot exceed one-third the contract value. Please see Appendix 1 for updated travel rates and guidelines for information on estimating field expenses.
Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Bartramia halleriana Haller's Apple Moss AB, BC Threatened,
(November 2011)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022
Leptogium platynum Batwing Vinyl Lichen BC Endangered,
(May 2011)
$9,000.00
Fall 2022
Peltigera gowardii Western Waterfan BC Special Concern,
(November 2013)
$9,000.00
Fall 2022
Peltigera hydrothyria Eastern Waterfan NB, NS, QC Threatened,
(November 2013)
$9,000.00
Fall 2022
Pterygoneurum kozlovii Alkaline Wing-nerved Moss AB, BC, SK, YT Threatened,
(November 2004)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022
Xanthaptychia aurantiaca Arctic Orangebush Lichen NT New $11,000.00
Fall 2022

Reptiles

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $14.000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Sistrurus catenatus Massasauga Carolinian population ON Endangered,
(November 2012)
Sistrurus catenatus Massasauga Great Lakes / St. Lawrence population ON Threatened,
(November 2012)
Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Thamnophis butleri Butler's Gartersnake ON Endangered,
(November 2010)
$12.000.00
Fall 2022

Terrestrial Mammals

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $15.000.00, Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Taxidea taxus jeffersonii American Badger taxus subspecies Western population BC Endangered,
(November 2012)
Taxidea taxus jacksoni American Badger taxus subspecies ON Endangered,
(November 2012)
Taxidea taxus jeffersonii American Badger taxus subspecies Eastern population BC Endangered,
(November 2012)
Taxidea taxus taxus American Badger taxus subspecies AB, MB, ON, SK Special Concern,
(November 2012)

Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft $15,000.00 Fall 2022

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status
Bison bison athabascae* Wood Bison AB, BC, NT, YT Special Concern,
(November 2013)
Bison bison bison* Plains Bison AB, BC, MB, SK Threatened,
(November 2013)

* An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.

Vascular Plants

Scientific Name Common Name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC Status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft
Aphyllon pinorum Pine Broomrape BC New $11,000.00
Fall 2022
Bidens amplissima Vancouver Island Beggarticks BC, MB Special Concern,
(November 2001)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022
Oenothera pallida pallida Pale Evening-primrose BC New $11,000.00
Fall 2022
Silphium terebinthinaceum Prairie Rosinweed ON New $11,000.00
Fall 2022
Smilax rotundifolia Round-leaved Greenbrier Great Lakes Plains Population ON Threatened,
(November 2007)
$11,000.00
Fall 2022

* Field verification of populations must be undertaken for Pine Broomrape (Aphyllon pinorum), Vancouver Island Beggarticks (Bidens amplissima), Pale Evening-primrose (Oenothera pallida pallida), Prairie Rosinweed (Silphium terebinthinaceum) and Round-leaved Greenbrier (Great Lakes Plains population) (Smilax rotundifolia). Note that more fieldwork would be expected for species with old or inadequate (e.g. no population count) field survey data. Potentially suitable habitats should be surveyed to the extent that is reasonable under the proposed budget limits. Successful candidates will have access to previous locality data to assist them in finding sites. Access to private properties for survey purposes requires landowner permission. Contract values include some funds for time required in determining land ownership and contacting landowners. The value for field verifications cannot exceed one-third the contract value. Please see Appendix 1 for updated travel rates and guidelines for information on estimating field expenses.


 

Part 3: Conditions of Contract and Instructions for Submitting Bids

Notice

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) seeks experts from the private or public sector to prepare a report on the status of the wildlife species listed in Part 2 above for the Fall 2021 Call for Bids.

Background

COSEWIC assesses wildlife species (including mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens) that are at risk of extinction or extirpation from Canada. Assessments are based on comprehensive wildlife species status reports on each wildlife species. Contracts are administered by Environment Canada via the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC may identify DUs below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance that are related to factors such as established taxonomy, genetic variation, range disjunction, and biogeographic distinction including regional climates. Guidelines for recognizing DUs below the species level.

Description of work

The contractor will use the best available information on the wildlife species, including scientific, community, and ATK, to write a comprehensive status report that will form the basis of an assessment on the status of the wildlife species in Canada, or a designatable unit report that may lead to a status report.

The content and format of the status report will conform to the Instructions for preparing COSEWIC status reports found on the COSEWIC web page, which specifies headings, the content under each heading, range maps, other figures and appendices. The contractor will also be required to use the typographic and editorial style set out in the template for status report preparation found on the COSEWIC website. Any illustrations or graphics used must be originals prepared by the contractor or, if not, appropriate authorization for their use must be obtained and clearly cited in the report.

Beginning in 2012, COSEWIC status reports also include Threats Classification and Assessment Calculators. Writers are expected to attend related teleconferences and to assist with this process.

The contractor will actively seek out all relevant and important existing sources of scientific, community and ATK. The contractor will also contact COSEWIC representatives from jurisdictions responsible for the wildlife species, as well as relevant Wildlife Management Boards, recovery team co-chairs (as applicable), and Conservation Data Centres to obtain the most recent information on the wildlife species. Contact information for the above agencies / organizations is provided in the required contacts for information on wildlife species.

The contractor is required to contact the COSEWIC Secretariat to obtain detailed instructions and ensure that methodologies and concepts are applied correctly and consistently in the preparation of wildlife species distribution maps and in the calculation of the extent of occurrence and index of area of occupancy. In addition, the contractor must submit to the COSEWIC Secretariat all survey data (wildlife species observation / localities, search effort), whether collected during fieldwork performed in the course of writing the status report or obtained from other sources. Every effort should be made to ensure that all data obtained can be transferred to COSEWIC by obtaining proper permissions.

Contractors should have a good understanding of COSEWIC’s assessment criteria and the definitions of terms used within the criteria before writing the report. This will allow the contractor to better describe the wildlife species’ situation in preparation for COSEWIC’s assessment. COSEWIC’s assessment criteria and definitions can be found in Table 2 and Table 6 on the COSEWIC web page.

In 2005, COSEWIC initiated an effort to solicit community knowledge on wildlife species for which status reports are commissioned. COSEWIC may receive information on wildlife species from the Community Knowledge section of its website. Information obtained through this source, including additional contact names, will be forwarded to the contractor for consideration and incorporation into the status report.

It is the responsibility of the contractor to include ATK relevant to the wildlife species status assessment in the status report (species for which a separate ATK report is being considered are identified in Part 2 above). This will be facilitated through the ATK Subcommittee, which will also review any ATK gathered by the contractor. All holders of ATK contacted must be appropriately acknowledged. Contractors must contact the COSEWIC Secretariat ATK Coordinator before commencing work on the status report. Contact information for the COSEWIC Secretariat ATK Coordinator and more information about gathering ATK are provided in the Instructions for preparing COSEWIC status reports.

Site verification may be required for the status report. Wildlife species requiring fieldwork are identified in Part 2 above. Contractors verifying field sites are required to obtain permission from private landowners before accessing private land. If the fieldwork can be completed with less expense using a rental vehicle rather than a private vehicle, contractors shall rent. Expenses for transportation, accommodations and meal allowances should be estimated using the guidelines outlined in Appendix 1 of this document. Automobile liability insurance will need to be maintained in force for the duration of the fieldwork for a limit of liability not less than $2,000,000 per accident or occurrence, in addition to physical damage insurance.

Once completed, the report will be subjected to a review process. The Draft Report, after receiving approval by the relevant COSEWIC Species Specialist Subcommittee (SSC) Co-chair, will be reviewed by the relevant SSC members, the ATK Subcommittee, the jurisdiction(s), relevant Wildlife Management Boards, recovery team Co-chairs (as applicable), and any other external reviewers recommended by the SSC. Comments and suggestions will be forwarded to the report writer with instructions from the SSC Co-chair for changes that must be incorporated to produce the Provisional Report. Over the course of subsequent review and the COSEWIC assessment, further modifications may be made to the report. Following the COSEWIC assessment, a final document entitled COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report will be published on the SARA Public Registry and/or will be archived at the COSEWIC Secretariat.

Additional optional work to be offered to winning bidders

In addition to the preparation of the status reports, the winning bidders may be offered the task to produce a description of the wildlife species’ residence using a defined set of guidelines and following a provided template. This part of the contract will be administered separately by Environment Canada. The information gathered describing the wildlife species’ residence will be requested at the same time as the Draft Report. The separate document detailing the wildlife species’ residence will be for a maximum value of $750.00 over and above the contract amount suggested in the Call for Bids.

The concept of residence may not apply to all wildlife species and will not be required for aquatic species, vascular plants, or lichens. For more information about this work, the contact person is Julie Nadeau (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Acknowledgment for the preparation of COSEWIC Status Reports

COSEWIC status reports commissioned after May 2001 are "living documents". After the report is concluded, any subsequent updates to status reports will be prepared simply by adding new information to the existing report and, where appropriate, by updating factual information. COSEWIC will be cited as the author on the cover page (ownership and copyright will rest with the Crown). Contractors who produce the initial status report or add information to the "living document" to produce an updated status report will be acknowledged as having prepared the status report. Over time, the Acknowledgements will list the contributors (report writers) who have provided their expertise.

Copyright and moral rights

Environment and Climate Change Canada has determined that any intellectual property arising from the performance of the Work under the Contract will vest in the Crown on the grounds that the production of the report and related documents are subject to Copyright and that the report is being produced to generate knowledge and information for public dissemination.

At the request of Environment and Climate Change Canada, the contractor will provide to the Crown a written permanent waiver of Moral Rights1 from all authors of the report, in a form acceptable to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

The contractor will be granted a license to use, copy, reproduce and publish portions of the Provisional Report provided that 1) the Contractor will not publish the entire Provisional Report, or distribute it to any third party, and 2) the Contractor acknowledges that the Crown has contributed Crown Copyright in the Provisional Report and includes the following notice and disclaimer in any new document which incorporates portions of the report: “Notice: Some of the information used or referenced in this document is Crown Copyright, compiled on behalf of COSEWIC under a contract with Environment Canada, however, comments or conclusions made by the author using this information do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Environment and Climate Change Canada or COSEWIC.

Property Rights in ATK

ATK is the property of those who hold it. Contractors will require permission for gathering ATK using appropriate consent forms to be provided. Knowledge holders will be provided with an opportunity to review and validate the factual information shared with the report writer before it is integrated into the status report. Raw information (e.g., transcripts, tapes, etc.) will be returned to the knowledge holder or the community for storage. The report writer shall not have any intellectual property rights in the knowledge provided from Aboriginal sources.

Awarding of Contracts

COSEWIC aims to seek out experts who will prepare the best possible wildlife species status reports. The best expertise may reside in the public or private sector, and as such, this Call for Bids is open to both.

As per the Treasury Board Contracting Policy, applicants who work for the public service must discuss with their employer and Conflict of Interest group of their plans to apply and whether they plan to do the work during work time or outside of work time.

Employer consent will be required before a contract is signed. There are also specific provisions within the Treasury Board Contracting Policy that pertain to former public servants in receipt of a pension or a lump sum payment.

The COSEWIC Call for Bids is a tool to advertise the need for writers of COSEWIC status reports or other reports. This Call for Bids does not guarantee that the work outlined in this document will go forward.

Value of contract

Allowable expenditures in the bid will include all professional services, fees (including applicable administrative fees), expenses including long-distance telephone calls, photocopying, courier, and travel in the course of research (including appropriate insurance for car rental or business use of private vehicle). Standard government contracting conditions will apply. Appendix 1 provides additional guidelines for estimating travel expenses for field work if applicable (see Part 2).

Schedule of deliverables and payments

Suggested timeframes to complete Draft Reports are provided for individual projects in Part 2. A detailed schedule of deliverables and payments is to be determined for successful candidates in discussions with SSC Co-chairs. Report writers are expected to submit their deliverables promptly on or before midnight of the due dates identified in their contract. For all payments, the deliverable must first be approved as acceptable by the SSC Co-chair. If a description of the wildlife species’ residence was requested (refer to Additional optional work to be offered to winning bidders), the deliverable must first be approved as acceptable by the relevant Environment and Climate Change Canada representatives before payment is issued.

Bid Evaluation

Bids received will be evaluated by at least three members of the relevant COSEWIC Species Specialist Subcommittee according to the following criteria:

Individuals preparing bids for COSEWIC status reports or other reports must adhere to the Bid Submission Template for each submission.

Bids that do not conform to the format and content of the Bid Submission Template will not be accepted by the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC will only accept bids for single reports, except where specified otherwise in Part 2.

Evaluation Criteria for Bids

Evaluation criteria for bids
Mandatory requirements Meets
Bid must conform to the formatting and length requirements in the Bid Submission Template. All components of the template must be completed. Yes No
The applicant must be willing to cede intellectual rights to the Crown, and be willing to waive moral rights in the report. Yes No
Rated criteria
Applicant’s total score Information and content provided is...
UNSATISFACTORY: 0-69% considered not acceptable for meeting the criteria for selection.
GOOD: 70-79% sufficient and will likely meet the specified requirements.
VERY GOOD: 80-90% more than sufficient and will more than meet the specified requirements.
EXCELLENT: 91-100% exceptional. Services offered exceed the specified requirements.
Bid evaluation grid
Category Maximum score*
1. Knowledge (including academic background, knowledge of wildlife species, knowledge of how to access information relevant for a COSEWIC status report or designatable unit report, including knowledge of French and/or English as needed to understand and synthesize available information, and an understanding of the respective roles of Report Writers and COSEWIC in drafting reports and producing assessments). 30
2. Writing experience (prior experience with COSEWIC and other reports if applicable, evidence of ability to incorporate editorial comments and of meeting deadlines, publication record. Ability to integrate ATK if required). 40
3. Work plan and budget (showing attainment of objectives within suggested time frame, expenditure justification (including allotment of no more than one third contract value for field verifications and consideration of the suggested value of the contract from the Call for Bids), availability of time to write report and incorporate editorial changes. In the case of a team application, clear description of each person's task and skills.**) 30
Total 100
* for each of the three rated categories, the bidder must show evidence of ability in all of the sub-categories indicated to attain a high score for the category. Evidence of poor performance in one sub-category could lead to a very low score.
** for bidders who have submitted multiple bids, evaluators will consider the feasibility of awarding multiple contracts to the same bidder, depending on the timelines and work required for each project.

Proposals will be evaluated, and the contract awarded by the Secretariat, based on the above requirements. Evaluators will study each bidder’s proposal, consult the references submitted by the bidder, and if required consult other references knowledgeable about the bidder’s work. Bids may be accepted in whole or in part, with or without negotiation.

The bidder with the lowest cost estimate will not necessarily be accepted. The contract award will be made by the Secretariat on the basis of best overall value to COSEWIC in terms of both technical merit and cost.

Questions, bid submission and acknowledgement

Questions and bids may be submitted to the COSEWIC Secretariat at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Bid submissions should include the following subject line “Bid for [wildlife species name]”.

A pdf version of the Bid Submission Template is available on the COSEWIC website. Please print, complete, and scan the template to submit bid to the Secretariat.

For a word document of the Bid Submission Template, please contact the Secretariat.

 

Deadline: Wednesday, January 5 at 3pm Eastern time. Late bids will not be accepted.

An acknowledgement of bid receipt will be sent by the Secretariat via email (unless an alternative method is requested) to each applicant within two business days. If an acknowledgement is not received within this time, please contact the Secretariat by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. During the last two days of the Call for Bids, the Secretariat will acknowledge receipt of bids as soon as possible, and at the latest, by the end of the business day that follows last day of the competition.


 

Appendix 1: Travel rates and guidelines

The following rates and guidelines should be used as a guide when planning fieldwork-related expenses. These are the approximate maximum claim amounts (subject to minor changes twice per year) for use of personal vehicle, accommodations, and meal allowances, although contractors are free to bill for lesser amounts. Expenses should reflect the number of days for each type of expense. Receipts are required for certain expenses, as indicated.

Please note that for contracts involving site verifications, the total value of the site verification travel expenses should generally be limited to one-third of the contract value. Thus, except under specific circumstances, the overall budget should be designed to reflect this. It is also important to ensure estimated costs for the field work include all possible costs in order that the amount eventually billed is the same or less than the estimated costs.

Please note that estimated fieldwork expenses should include appropriate insurance coverage for automobile rental or business use of private vehicle (minimum $ 2 million liability, plus physical damage insurance) for the duration of the planned fieldwork. Note that automobile insurance in place for personal use will often not meet the contractor's obligation under the terms of this type of contract; therefore the contractor must obtain proper automobile insurance for use of its own vehicle when performing work under the contract or rent a vehicle with increased/extended insurance coverage.

Summary of travel expenses allowed for reimbursement

Car rental: receipt required for rental, receipts required for gas

Private vehicle (gas included) (Note that if the fieldwork can be completed with less expense using a rental vehicle rather than a private vehicle, contractors shall rent. The following rates are payable in cents per kilometre based on the province or territory of registration of the vehicle). Cents/km (taxes included)
Alberta 51.0
British Columbia 56.0
Manitoba 52.0
New Brunswick 54.5
Newfoundland and Labrador 58.0
Northwest Territories 64.5
Nova Scotia 55.0
Nunavut 60.0
Ontario 57.5
Prince Edward Island 53.0
Quebec 55.0
Saskatchewan 51.5
Yukon 63.0

Commercial accommodations: receipt required

Accommodations in a private residence: claim $50.00 (private non-commercial accommodation allowance).

Meal allowances (excluding YT, NT, NU, which are higher):

  • Breakfast: $21.35 (no receipt required)
  • Lunch: $21.60(no receipt required)
  • Dinner: $53.00 (no receipt required)
  • Total per day: $95.95 (no receipt required)

Seventy-five percent (75%) of the meal and incidental allowances shall be paid starting on the 31st consecutive calendar day and fifty percent (50%) of the meal allowance on the 121st consecutive calendar day of travel status at the same location when corporate residences or apartment hotels are available to a traveller in the area surrounding the workplace, or when the traveller chooses to stay in private accommodation.

Effective July 1, 2017, non public service travelers are no longer reimbursed for incidental expenses..


(1) Moral rights, as defined by the Copyright Act, include a) the right of having the author’s name associated with the Work, where reasonable in the circumstances; and b) the right to the integrity of the Work such as preventing the Work from being changed, corrected or amended.

About us

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) is an independent advisory panel to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada that meets twice a year to assess the status of wildlife species at risk of extinction. Members are wildlife biology experts from academia, government, non-governmental organizations and the private sector responsible for designating wildlife species in danger of disappearing from Canada.

COSEWIC secretariat

Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 St. Joseph Blvd, 16th floor
Gatineau QC K1A 0H3

Email: ec.cosepac-cosewic.ec@canada.ca