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COSEWIC candidate wildlife species

Updated: July 7, 2020

List of wildlife species grouped by the type of wildlife and by its risk of extinction. Each species is assigned to one of 3 groups, depending on how urgently it needs to be assessed. Species in the highest urgency group are reviewed and ranked to create the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) candidate list.

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Part 1: overview

Many species in Canada have not yet been assessed by COSEWIC, but are suspected of being at some risk of extinction or extirpation. These species, referred to as ‘candidate wildlife species’ are identified by the species specialist subcommittees (SSCs) or by the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) subcommittee as candidates for detailed status assessment. Candidates may also include wildlife species already assessed by COSEWIC as not at risk or data deficient, but where new information suggests they may be at risk.

SSC and ATK subcommittee members use their expert knowledge and judgment to identify candidate wildlife species. They draw on numerous sources of information including (where available) the General Status of Wild Species in Canada program, information drawn from other multi-jurisdictional monitoring, jurisdictional and international assessment processes (e.g. IUCN and NatureServe) and published ranking systems in the scientific literature. As time and resources allow, COSEWIC will commission status reports for high priority candidate wildlife species so that an assessment can be undertaken.

Status reports are commissioned by COSEWIC through an open competition. A call for bids is periodically posted on this website both for selected candidate species, and also for species already assessed by COSEWIC that require a reassessment. You can register to be notified when new calls for bids are posted on the website.

For more information on candidate wildlife species, visit COSEWIC wildlife species assessment: process, categories, and guidelines.


Part 2: COSEWIC candidate list

The highest priority wildlife species from the SSC candidate lists are reviewed and ranked by COSEWIC, and result in COSEWIC candidate list. COSEWIC bases its ranking on prioritization data submitted by each SSC. COSEWIC candidate list identifies the highest priority candidate wildlife species for status report production. Wildlife species included in this list include those not yet assessed by COSEWIC and those in the not at risk or data deficient categories, where new information suggests they may be at risk of extinction or extirpation from Canada.

2016 (2) species

Common name: Ashy Pebblesnail

Taxonomic group: Molluscs

Scientific name: Fluminicola fuscus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This freshwater snail was historically sporadically distributed in the Columbia River and a few major tributaries in five states and BC. Populations have been lost from most tributaries and almost all the Columbia River itself; impoundment, nutrient enhancement, warming, and loss of rocky substrate are threats. In Canada, this snail was collected approximately 150 years ago, and has not been seen since until it was recently (2012-2014) collected in the Columbia River near Trail, BC. It is uncertain if it still lives at the historical occupied Kootenay and Wigwam river sites in BC.

Common name: Nevada Buckmoth

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Hemileuca nevadensis

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Canadian Wildlife Service, Manitoba, Parks Canada Agency, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This species is a large, charismatic day-flying moth in the giant silkworm family (Saturniidae). In Canada, this species is restricted to two types of specific habitats where it occurs as very isolated populations. In Alberta, Saskatchewan and western Manitoba, it occurs only on sand dunes of the parkland ecoregion where stunted aspen trees predominate. In southeastern Manitoba and adjacent Ontario, this species is known from several populations in mesic tallgrass prairie/carr complexes with abundant willows. Such habitat secialization and a small geographic range suggest that the species may be at risk.

2018 (6) species

Common name: [a liverwort]

Taxonomic group: Mosses

Scientific name: Apotreubia hortoniae

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2019

Rationale: Apotreubia hortoniae is a rare liverwort that is restricted to hyperoceanic climate and known from only a handful of sites at Haida Gwai and nearby islands. Potential threats include tourist infrastructure, wood harvesting and quarrying.

Common name: [a moss]

Taxonomic group: Mosses

Scientific name: Sphagnum cyclophyllum

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2019

Rationale: Sphagnum cyclophyllum is a rare coastal plain peat moss restricted to two sites in southern Nova Scotia. Potential threats include ATV use and peat harvest. The species may also be vulnerable to multiple impacts of sea level rise.

Common name: Boreal Awningclam

Taxonomic group: Molluscs

Scientific name: Solemya borealis

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Atlantic Ocean, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Boreal Awningclam is one of the few species from the family Solemyidae living in Canadian waters. This marine species is at the northern limit of its range off Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Like other species of Solemyidae, it forms symbiotic associations with sulfur-oxidizing bacteria that live in its gills and provide it with nutrients. It burrows in fine, organic-rich mud at a range of depths (0-500 m); the presence of this species in intertidal muds, as observed recently off Nova Scotia, is rare. The species appears to have been fairly common in offshore sediments, but is now infrequently collected. Threats are uncertain.

Common name: Dwarf Western Trillium

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Trilium ovatum hibbersonii

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This species occurs only on western Vancouver Island, at a handful of remote and relatively inaccessible sites. Threats include mostly collateral damage from construction of logging roads, increased forest cover as succession proceeds, and rock gardeners who remove plants from the wild.

Common name: Gaspe Grasshopper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Melanoplus gaspesiensis

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Quebec

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: The Gaspe Grasshopper (Melanoplus gaspesiensis) is globally restricted to the summit of Mount Albert in the Gaspé in Québec and is believed to have survived in refugia during various glacial episodes, most recently the Wisconsinan. The species and its habitat are threatened from climate change and possibly mining and mineral extraction.

Common name: Pacific Lasiopogon

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Lasiopogon pacificus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: The Pacific Lasiopogon (Lasiopogon pacificus) is known from Vancouver to Oregon on coastal beaches and river banks. In Canada it is restricted to the lower Fraser River Valley from the Mission area west to Vancouver. It is known from four or five sites in Canada along the Fraser River. Many of the beaches and riparian areas in the Fraser Valley have been destroyed in the past decades, however suitable habitat remains.

2019 (21) species

Common name: [a darkling beetle]

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Ephalus latimanus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This flightless beetle is known in Canada only from Sable Island, Nova Scotia and is perhaps an ice age relict from the Georges Bank refugia. Elsewhere it ranges on coastal dunes on the US Atlantic seaboard from New Jersey to Maine. This species is a common nocturnal species on sand dunes throughout its range. The species lives in loose sand and leaf litter around the roots and at the base of plants such as sea rocket, Cakile edentula (Bigelow) Hook. (Brassicaceae), and seaside goldenrod, Solidago sempervirens L. (Asteraceae).

Common name: Atlantic Mackerel

Taxonomic group: Marine fishes

Scientific name: Scomber scombrus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Atlantic Ocean, Canadian Wildlife Service, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Atlantic Mackerel is found in the waters of the Northwest Atlantic from North Carolina to Newfoundland. During spring and summer, Atlantic Mackerel is found in inshore waters. From late fall and in winter, it is found deeper in warmer waters at the edge of the continental shelf. In Canadian waters, spawning occurs mainly in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence during June and July. Atlantic Mackerel have declined about 80% since the late 1990s. Overfishing is considered the main threat.

Common name: Bronze Pinecone

Taxonomic group: Molluscs

Scientific name: Strobilops aeneus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Strobilops aeneus is a small, rare land snail that only occurs in southern Ontario from the Ottawa Valley to Essex County. It is possibly present in southwestern Quebec (Gatineau), having been recorded there from a cave infill, but no living snails have been found in Quebec. Two records from the Maritimes were misidentifications. Altogether, only 8 records are known and only 3 (from 2 sites) since 1941 (Forsyth and Oldham 2014); the Ottawa site was revisited and reconfirmed in 2016. This species was always rare and sporadic in Ontario (Oughton 1948); it occurs only in the Mixedwood Plains ecozone, lives in rich, old-growth forests, and is likely under threat due to loss and degradation of habitat. Some of historical occurrence sites are likely to have been lost through habitat loss and degradation. Current threats might include invasive species (such as earthworms, which change forest floor structure and eliminate microhabitat) and anthropogenic pressures.

Common name: Canadian Toad

Taxonomic group: Amphibians

Scientific name: Anaxyrus hemiophrys

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Canadian Wildlife Service, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Parks Canada Agency, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Canadian Toad is a wide-ranging species with approximately 90% of its global distribution in Canada. The species has declined drastically in parts of Alberta over the past few decades with shrinkage of its range eastward. Threats include habitat loss and fragmentation from agriculture, oil and gas exploration and extraction, forestry, and associated expanding road network, emerging epidemic diseases, and climate change. Life history characteristics, particularly late age at maturity (3 -5 years) and the possibility that females may breed only once in their life time, hinder the ability of populations to rebound after disturbances.

Common name: Cleland's Evening-primrose

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Oenothera clelandii

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This annual/biennial wildflower has a small and localized distribution in Ontario and occurs in very low numbers. Threatened by habitat loss, disturbance and climate change, it has very few extant sites recorded in recent years and is considered critically imperilled in Ontario.

Common name: Forked Bluecurls

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Trichostema dichotomum

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency, Quebec

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Forked Bluecurls is an annual in the mint family (Lamiaceae), widespread in the eastern USA but reaching Canada in only 8-9 subpopulations in southernmost Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Numbers are low (unknown in Ontario, 5,000 to 10,000 in Quebec and 300 in Nova Scotia) and plants occur over only 3.6 hectares in Canada. Ontario and Quebec occurrences are in sand barrens subject to the impacts of invasive species, all-terrain vehicles, land conversion for other uses, and natural succession in the absence of fire. The Nova Scotia plants occur in a single, relatively remote rock barren opening potentially threatened by unauthorized all-terrain vehicle use and gold mining.

Common name: Globose Dome

Taxonomic group: Molluscs

Scientific name: Ventridens ligera

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This is one of only three species of large-shell terrestrial snails belonging to the genus Ventridens potentially in Canada. It is a rare species at the northern limit of its range in south-western Ontario and likely always has been rare in Canada. Some of historical occurrences have already been lost through habitat loss and degradation. Other threats might be invasive species, climate change and anthropogenic pressure (pollution and disturbance).

Common name: Gray-cheeked Thrush (minimus subspecies)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Catharus minimus minimus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Newfoundland and Labrador, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This species breeds only on the island of Newfoundland and a small portion of adjacent Labrador and possibly extreme eastern Quebec. Recent studies support the genetic, geographic, and morphological distinctions between this subspecies and the Northern Gray-cheeked Thrush (C. m. aliciae), which breeds across the boreal forest from Alaska to Labrador. The Newfoundland Gray-cheeked Thrush nests primarily in old-growth Balsam Fir forests, as well as shrubby deciduous thickets. Although it was widespread and numerous in Newfoundland until at the least mid-1980s, it has undergone a rapid decline and is now considered rare, with a provincial status of Threatened. Breeding Bird Survey data indicate a population decline of 68% between 2005 and 2015, and an overall 90% loss over the past 35 years. This is likely a function of multiple threats, most notably nest predation by Red Squirrel, loss of old growth forest nesting habitat, and deforestation of wintering grounds in Colombia.

Common name: Greenland Shark

Taxonomic group: Marine fishes

Scientific name: Somniosus microcephalus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Canadian Wildlife Service, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: The Greenland shark is a very large sleeper shark commonly found in the high latitudes of the North Atlantic and Arctic waters. Greenland Sharks have an extremely conservative life history. Longevity was recently estimated to be the highest documented for any vertebrate, at 392 years. The generation time is estimated as 154 to 198 years. Bycatch of Greenland Shark is the main threat. This bycatch occurs mostly in shrimp and Greenland Halibut fisheries. While reported bycatch has declined, lack of reporting on logbooks, variable at-sea observer coverage, and inaccurate weight estimates create concern.

Common name: Hoary Edge

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Achalarus lyciades

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This butterfly inhabits the fragmented and at-risk open woodlands, deciduous mixed forest and sandy areas of southern Ontario. Although common farther south, the Hoary Edge is extremely rare in Canada, with under ten records known to date; these are all from the same area although an undocumented colony may exist. Only one generation occurs in the northern part of its range (two farther south), with adults on the wing from early June to early July in Ontario.

Common name: Large-lipped Sand Beetle

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Omophron labiatum

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This beetle is only known in Canada from Sable Island, and is disjunct from the nearest known populations in New England and Massachusetts. The species occurs in open, sandy, and usually damp ground along the coastal zone, from sea beaches inland to altitudes up to about 275 m, as well as saline beaches or on the bare shores of ponds, lakes and rivers. The species is nocturnal, and adults appear to be gregarious, so it is often found in large numbers where it occurs.

Common name: Pyramid Dome

Taxonomic group: Molluscs

Scientific name: Ventridens intertextus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This is one of only three species of large-shell terrestrial snails in the genus Ventridens potentially in Canada. It is a rare species at the northern limit of its range in southwestern Ontario and likely always has been rare in Canada. Some of historical occurrence sites have already been lost through habitat loss and degradation. Other threats might be invasive species (earthworms, which change forest floor structure and eliminate microhabitat), climate change, and anthropogenic pressures.

Common name: Rough-leaved Aster

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Eurybia radulina

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: Rough-leaved aster (Eurybia radulina (A. Gray) G.L. Nesom) is a perennial herb with few to several, ascending to erect short-hairy stems, 10-70 cm tall. Stem leaves broadly oblanceolate or spoon-shaped, to 13 cm long, hairy, toothed. Flowering heads with ray and disk flowers; ray flowers white to pale violet; disk flowers yellow. Occurs on dry rock outcrops and open forests in the lowland zone of SE Vancouver Island; known from 4 sites but may occur at one or more of 7 historical sites.

Common name: Sable Island Borer

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Papaipema sp.

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This moth is an undescribed subspecies of Noctuid moth that is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The larval host is unknown, but it may bore the roots and stems of a single Asteraceae like related species. The larvae of the sister species on mainland Nova Scotia (P. nelita) bore into stems and roots of the aster Cutleaf Coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata L.).Adult records are from mid-August and mid-September and are attracted to lights. The habitat is unknown but there are limited possibilities (i.e. grassland/herbaceous, sand/dune, shrubland/chaparral) on Sable Island which is treeless, sandy and dry.

Common name: Sable Island Cutworm Moth

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Agrotis arenarius

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This species is a Noctuid moth endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The moth has an annual life cycle and is dependent on Ammophila grasses. These grasses are native to coasts of the North Atlantic and are found almost exclusively on the first line of coastal sand dunes, have creeping underground stems or rhizomes allow them to thrive under conditions of shifting sands and high winds, and help to stabilize and prevent coastal erosion. Many species in this genus are of great importance as cutworms, major agricultural pests whose larvae hide by day and emerge at night to feed. Not all species in this genus are agricultural pests.

Common name: Sable Island Eucosma

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Eucosma sableana

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This moth is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The moth presumably has a 1-year life cycle. The larval food plant is unknown. Eucosma sableana is closely related to the widespread species E. ochrocephala, which feeds on cocklebur (Xanthium spp.) as a larva. Xanthium does not occur on Sable Island, but perhaps the food plant is another Asteraceae species. It is noted as being "common at light in August and September".

Common name: Sable Island Leaf Beetle

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Tricholochmaea sablensis

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This species appears to be a post-glacial relict species found only on Sable Island, Nova Scotia. It has been collected from bog cranberry (Vaccinmium macrocarpon), which is restricted to a cranberry bog near a small freshwater lake on Sable Island. The lake, which had a salinity of 25 ppm was less saline than any of the surrounding lakes. Collecting on Sable Island in 1976-77 and 1989 failed to find any on Sable Island and recent work in 2004 has also failed to turn up any specimens, casting some doubt on whether the species is still extant.

Common name: Short-fruited Rush

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Juncus brachycarpus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This perennial rush is restricted in Canada to remnants of moist, sandy prairie in Windsor, Ontario. Major threats include residential and commercial development, transportation corridor development, invasive species and encroachment of trees and shrubs in the prairie habitat due to lack of fire.

Common name: Valley Grasshopper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Oedaleontus enigma

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This grasshopper is associated with arid shrub-steppe in the intermountain west and reaches its northern limit in the southern Okanagan Valley, British Columbia. Within its Canadian range, it is highly localized and has only been recorded at one site; a parcel of provincial crown land that is under threat of annexation for conversion to residential housing by the Town of Osoyoos. In the US portion of its range, this species sometimes increases to outbreak proportions and is considered a range pest, although it is primarily a forb and shrub feeder and will feed heavily on introduced forbs that themselves degrade range condition. Native host plants include spring parsley, balsamroot, big sagebrush, and rabbitbrush as well as several introduced weeds: redstem filaree, flixweed, and downy brome.

Common name: White-marked Tussock Moth (Sable Island spp.)

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Orgyia leucostigma sablensis

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This moth is globally endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. The species was described as an endemic subspecies of the more widespread White-marked Tussock Moth, based on collections from Sable Island in the 1970s. Larvae were collected from blueberry, cranberry, iris, bayberry and both grasses and sedges. On the mainland other subspecies of White-marked Tussock Moth larvae feed on a wide variety of plants including both conifers and flowering plants. Adults have been collected from early August into mid-September.

Common name: White-winged Grasshopper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Dissosteira spurcata

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This grasshopper is associated with arid shrub-steppe in the intermountain west. It reaches its northern limit in the southern Okanagan Valley. Within its Canadian range, it is highly localized and has been recently recorded at only two sites. One is a Haynes Lease Wildlife Area at the north end of Osoyoos Lake and the other is a parcel of crown land on the west side of Osoyoos. While the wildlife area is secure, the crown land is under pressure for annexation and development by the town of Osoyoos. It is currently used for off-road driving and hiking. The species could also occur on the east side of Osoyoos Lake on the Osoyoos Indian Reserve. This would not greatly change the status of the species.

2020 (19) species

Common name: Arctic Orangebush Lichen

Taxonomic group: Lichens

Scientific name: Xanthaptychia aurantiaca

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Northwest Territories, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Xanthaptychia aurantiaca is narrowly restricted to western portions of the Canadian Arctic. It is a relatively large bright orange macrolichen that is conspicuous on the landscape. However, there are only 14 known collections. The region has been thoroughly surveyed for lichens (see map under Search Effort), with over 6600 lichens collections known. This suggests that X. aurantiaca is not only narrowly endemic, but also rare within its range. All collections are coastal. Most collections have been made on Banks Island and the Parry Peninsula in the Northwest Territories. This species is threatened by a loss of habitat from rapidly eroding coasts, saline wash resulting from storm surges, and permafrost melting. These threats are due to a reduction in sea ice cover on the Beaufort Sea and changes in weather patterns caused by on-going climate change.

Common name: Horned Lark

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Alsek Renewable Resources Council, British Columbia, Canadian Museum of Nature, Carmacks Renewable Resources Council, Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council, Canadian Wildlife Service, Dawson District Renewable Resources Council, Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council, Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Board, Gwich'in Renewable Resources Board, Laberge Renewable Resources Council, Manitoba, Mayo District Renewable Resources Council, New Brunswick, Nisga'a Joint Fisheries Management Committee, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board, Nova Scotia, Northwest Territories, Nunavut Territory, Nisga'a Wildlife Committee, Nunavut Wildlife Management Board, North Yukon Renewable Resources Council, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency, Porcupine Caribou Management Board, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Sahtu Renewable Resources Board, Selkirk Renewable Resources Council, Teslin Renewable Resources Council, Torngat Wildlife and Plants Co-management Board, Wildlife Management Advisory Council - North Slope, Wildlife Management Advisory Council - Northwest Territories, Wekeezhii Renewable Resources Board, Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, Yukon Territory

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Horned Lark is a Holarctic landbird that occurs in Canada's tundra and prairie grasslands, and other open landscapes from seaside barrens to above the alpine tree-line. One of the eight subspecies that occur in Canada, Streaked Horned Lark, was assessed by COSEWIC as Endangered in 2003 and 2018; the other seven are considered here. Horned Lark subspecies differ in range, body size and colouration. Most subspecies have populations estimated at >1 million mature individuals in Canada, but Pallid Horned Lark and Dusky Horned Lark may have only 15,000 to 20,000 mature individuals each. Overall, the Canadian population of Horned Lark is estimated to be about 28 million mature individuals. After apparent increases in the late 1800s, most populations have declined continuously since the 1940s, with loss of marginal agricultural areas and intensification of agriculture in breeding areas, and loss of native grassland habitat negatively affecting populations on both breeding and wintering grounds. Population estimates and trends are difficult to determine for individual subspecies, and appear to vary substantially. However, at the national level, Breeding Bird Survey data for Horned Lark show a long-term (1970-2018) decline of 89% (95% credible interval: -91%, -86%), corresponding to a trend of -4.4% per year (-4.9%, -4.0%), with a short-term (2008-2018) decline of -58% (-64%, -52%), corresponding to an annual trend of -8.4% (-9.7%, -7.0%).

Common name: Horned Lark (Northern)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris alpestris

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Ontario, Quebec

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Northern Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada, and one of two that breeds only in Canada. In summer it ranges from northwestern Ontario to Labrador; in winter it occurs widely across the central and eastern United States, and southeastern Canada. Trends are difficult to estimate because the breeding range is poorly monitored by the Breeding Bird Survey, whereas Christmas Bird Count coverage is good, but the range entirely overlaps that of Prairie Horned Lark. Long-term (1970-2017) declines are likely in the range of 60-90%; short-term (2007-2017) declines are probably 25-40%. Climate change is likely the primary threat within the breeding range, but the subspecies may be exposed to other threats during winter, including agriculture, energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, and pollution.

Common name: Horned Lark (Pallid)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris arcticola

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service, Yukon Territory

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Pallid Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada. Its Canadian breeding range extends from Yukon to alpine regions of British Columbia; in winter it occurs from interior British Columbia south to Wyoming and northern California. It is one of scarcest subspecies in Canada, with approximately 20,000 mature individuals, although precision of this estimate is poor. Long-term Christmas Bird Count data for the wintering range shared by Pallid Horned Lark and Dusky Horned Lark indicate a 71% long-term decline (1970-2017), equivalent to a 23% short-term (2007-2017) decrease. It is unknown whether the rate of decline differs between the two subspecies. However, most of the identified threats (agriculture, energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, and pollution) are more prominent in the wintering range, and therefore it is likely that both subspecies are experiencing a long-term decline.

Common name: Horned Lark (Saskatchewan)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris enthymia

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: not available

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Saskatchewan Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada. It overlaps to some degree with Desert Horned Lark in southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It is likely the second-most abundant subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada, with approximately 7 million mature individuals, but Saskatchewan and Manitoba Breeding Bird Survey data suggest a long-term (1970-2018) decline of 89% and a short-term (2008-2018) decline of 42%. Agricultural intensification is likely the greatest threat to this subspecies throughout its annual cycle, but other threats include energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, pollution, and climate change.

Common name: Horned Lark (Hoyts)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris hoyti

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Canadian Wildlife Service, Manitoba, Northwest Territories, Nunavut Territory, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Hoyt's Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada, and one of two that breeds only in Canada. It is the most widespread of Canada's Horned Lark subspecies, breeding widely through Northwest Territories and Nunavut, and the northern portions of provinces from Alberta to Quebec. It is also the most abundant subspecies, with an estimated 15 million mature individuals, comprising more than half of the national total for the species as a whole. Trends are inferred from Christmas Bird Counts across the wintering range of Hoyt's Horned Lark. They suggest moderate declines of 52% over the long-term (1970-2017) and 15% over the short-term (2007-2017), although there is considerable uncertainty given overlap with other subspecies in part of the wintering range. Climate change is likely the primary threat within the breeding range, but the subspecies may be exposed to other threats during winter, including agriculture, energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, and pollution.

Common name: Horned Lark (Desert)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris leucolaema

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Manitoba, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Saskatchewan Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada. It overlaps to some degree with Desert Horned Lark in southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It is likely the second-most abundant subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada, with approximately 7 million mature individuals, but Saskatchewan and Manitoba Breeding Bird Survey data suggest a long-term (1970-2018) decline of 89% and a short-term (2008-2018) decline of 42%. Agricultural intensification is likely the greatest threat to this subspecies throughout its annual cycle, but other threats include energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, pollution, and climate change.

Common name: Horned Lark (Dusky)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris merrilli

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Wildlife Service

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Dusky Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada. Its Canadian breeding is limited to lower elevations in the central and southern interior of British Columbia; in winter it occurs from interior British Columbia south to Wyoming and northern California. It is one of scarcest subspecies in Canada, with approximately 15,000 mature individuals, although precision of this estimate is poor. Long-term Christmas Bird Count data for the wintering range shared by Pallid Horned Lark and Dusky Horned Lark indicate a 71% long-term decline (1970-2017), equivalent to a 23% short-term (2007-2017) decrease. However, Breeding Bird Survey data for Dusky Horned Lark indicate steeper declines of 98% over the long-term and 82% over the short-term. Threats include agriculture, energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, pollution, and climate change.

Common name: Horned Lark (Prairie)

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Eremophila alpestris praticola

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Prairie Horned Lark is one of eight subspecies of Horned Lark in Canada. Despite its name, it ranges from Ontario to Nova Scotia, south of the boreal forest; in winter it occurs widely across the central and eastern United States, and southeastern Canada. Trends are estimated from the Breeding Bird Survey, which indicates a long-term (1970-2018) decline of 94%, and a short-term (2008-2018) decline of 65%. Loss of suitable grassland habitat to agriculture or urban expansion may be key threats for this subspecies, in addition to energy production and mining, transportation, invasive species, pollution, and climate change.

Common name: Lupine Leafroller Moth

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Anacampsis lupinella

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Lupine Leafroller Moth (Anacampsis lupinella) ranges in southern Ontario within the dry, open oak woodland, pitch pine-scrub oak barrens where the host plant, Wild Lupine (Lupinus perennis) is present. Wild Lupine is also at-risk and ranked vulnerable (N2N3) in Canada and Ontario (S2S3). Records date from 1901 - 2017 and the species is known from High Park (Toronto), the St. Williams Conservation Reserve (and a nearby private property, both in Norfolk County), and in the Karner Blue Sanctuary( Lambton County). An additional subpopulation may be present in/around Pinery Provincial Park, where a moderate-sized wild lupine population persists. Threats include invasive species that are changing the ecosystem and impacting the host plans, pesticide spray to control non-native Gypsy Moth outbreaks, and habitat conversion and fragmentation.

Common name: Oslar's Roadside Skipper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Amblyscirtes oslari

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Oslar's Roadside Skipper (Amblyscirtes oslari) is a dry, mixed grass prairies, open woodlands, ravines, and canyons prairie butterfly with a restricted range in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan. Adults fly from May to July, there is one generation per season and the larvae feed on blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) or other grasses. The species is known from eight sites: Lethbridge (AB), Writing-on-stone Provincial Park (AB), Taber (AB), North Pinhorn Grazing Preserve (AB), Estuary (SK), Val Marie (SK), Deer Forks (SK) and Roche Percee (SK). Widespread habitat conversion during the early 1900s and the loss of Plains Bison contributed to the loss of prairie grassland habitat suitable for this species. Current threats include agricultural intensification, habitat fragmentation and lack of connectivity between natural grassland fragments, invasive plants that change soil chemistry and/or outcompete native larval and nectar host plants, and roadside/agricultural pesticide use. There are currently no Canadian records on iNaturalist, BugGuide or other citizen science/online forums.

Common name: Pahaska Skipper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Hesperia pahaska

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Manitoba, Parks Canada Agency, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Pahaska Skipper (Hesperia pahaska) is a dry, mixed grass prairie and open pine forest butterfly with a restricted range in southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Adults fly from June to July, with one generation per season in Canada and larvae feed on blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), with fluff grass (Erioneuron pulchellum) also reported as a host plant in other parts of its US range. Records are from 1928 to 2009 from five sites including Surprise Valley (SK), Rosefield (SK), Minton (1928, SK), Grasslands National Park (SK) and Miniota (MB). Widespread habitat conversion during the early 1900's and the loss of Plains Bison contributed to the loss of prairie grassland habitat suitable for this species. Current threats include agricultural intensification, habitat fragmentation and lack of connectivity between natural grassland fragments, invasive plants that change and/or outcompete native larval and nectar host plants, and roadside/agricultural pesticide use. There are currently no Canadian records on iNaturalist, BugGuide or other citizen science/online forums.

Common name: Paintedhand Mudbug

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Lacunicambarus polychromatus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: The Paintedhand Mudbug (Lacunicambarus polychromatus) is a burrowing crayfish known in Canada from one subpopulation in Windsor, Ontario. This freshwater species excavates its own burrows in low-lying habitats close to the water table, including the banks and floodplains of lakes and rivers, roadside ditches, and wetlands. The life history is poorly known although the species consumes both plant material and animals such as insects and worms, seizing passing prey from the mouth of their burrows. Threats include a any form of development that impacts wetland longevity, quality and sustainability: wetland habitat infilling, conversion, water diversion (to wetlands), pesticide/wastewater/roadside salt run-off.

Common name: Pale Evening-primrose

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Oenothera pallida pallida

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Pale Evening-primrose (Oenothera pallida ssp. pallida) is a perennial rhizomatous herb with erect or ascending, simple or branched stems more than 20 cm tall. Flowers are large and fragrant, several to many, on leafy spikes with four pink or purple petals. Fruits are linear capsules. This subspecies is known from dry sandy slopes and banks in seven subpopulations in the south Okanagan of British Columbia, and in several US states as well.

Common name: Pine Broomrape

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Aphyllon pinorum

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: British Columbia, Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Pine broomrape is a self-fertile achlorophyllous, obligate root parasite that was first observed in 1914 in BC somewhere along the Cowichan River, and then re-discovered in 2000 in Koksilah River Provincial Park. It appears to parasitize Holodiscus exclusively. It is also found outside the park in forest lands that have been and likely will be harvested in the future.

Common name: Prairie Rosinweed

Taxonomic group: Vascular plants

Scientific name: Silphium terebinthinaceum

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: This tall perennial plant is restricted In Canada to small, remnant prairie habitats in southwestern Ontario. There are likely six populations with a total of approximately 2500 plants, most of which are found in one population. Threats to all populations include encroachment by woody plants due to fire suppression and invasive species. Habitat conversion to housing, roads, and agriculture threaten many of the populations.

Common name: Sable Island Bordered Apamea

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Apamea sordens sableana

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Nova Scotia, Parks Canada Agency

Proposed call for bids date: 2020

Rationale: This subspecies is a noctuid moth endemic to Sable Island, Nova Scotia. It has an annual life cycle and its larvae feed on dune-associated grasses. Many species in this genus are of great importance as cutworms, major agricultural pests whose larvae hide by day and emerge at night to feed. Not all species in this genus are agricultural pests.

Common name: Simius Roadside Skipper

Taxonomic group: Arthropods

Scientific name: Notamblyscirtes simius

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Canadian Museum of Nature, Canadian Wildlife Service, Parks Canada Agency, Saskatchewan

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Simius Roadside-Skipper (Notamblyscirtes simius) is a mixed grass prairie butterfly with a restricted range in southern Saskatchewan. Adults fly from May to July, there is one generation per season and the larvae feed on blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis). The species is known from three sites in southern Saskatchewan including Rosefeld (1968), Val Marie (1983) and an unknown collection locality that needs further investigation. There are no known documented occurrences in Canada since at least 1998. Widespread habitat conversion during the early 1900's and the loss of Plains Bison contributed to the loss of prairie grassland habitat suitable for this species. Current threats include agricultural intensification, habitat fragmentation and lack of connectivity between natural grassland fragments, invasive plants that change and/or outcompete native larval and nectar host plants, and roadside/agricultural pesticide use. There are currently no Canadian records on iNaturalist, BugGuide or other citizen science/online forums.

Common name: Snowy Owl

Taxonomic group: Birds

Scientific name: Bubo scandiacus

Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions: Alberta, Alsek Renewable Resources Council, British Columbia, Canadian Museum of Nature, Carmacks Renewable Resources Council, Carcross/Tagish Renewable Resources Council, Canadian Wildlife Service, Dawson District Renewable Resources Council, Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council, Eeyou Marine Region Wildlife Board, Gwich'in Renewable Resources Board, Hunting, Fishing and Trapping Coordinating Committee, Inuvialuit Game Council, Laberge Renewable Resources Council, Manitoba, Mayo District Renewable Resources Council, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board, Nova Scotia, Northwest Territories, Nunavut Territory, Nisga'a Wildlife Committee, Nunavut Wildlife Management Board, North Yukon Renewable Resources Council, Ontario, Parks Canada Agency, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan, Sahtu Renewable Resources Board, Selkirk Renewable Resources Council, Teslin Renewable Resources Council, Torngat Wildlife and Plants Co-management Board, Wildlife Management Advisory Council - North Slope, Wildlife Management Advisory Council - Northwest Territories, Wekeezhii Renewable Resources Board, Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board, Yukon Territory

Proposed call for bids date: 2021

Rationale: Snowy Owl is a large Arctic predator that travels long distances in response to fluctuating prey abundance. Although previously thought to number over 200,000 worldwide, recent studies concluded that the global population is likely to be <30,000 mature individuals, of which approximately 30-40% likely breed in Canada, primarily in the tundra of Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut, but also at the northern fringes of Manitoba, Quebec, and Labrador. Data from the Christmas Bird Count indicate a long-term average annual decline of 1.7% year, amounting to 46% over three generations (36 years). Threats underlying this decline are not well known, although the rapid pace of climate change in the Arctic breeding grounds is likely a key factor through altering prey availability and other effects on habitat.

For a full copy of the COSEWIC candidate species rationale, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Part 3: species specialist subcommittees’ candidate list

Each SSC annually prepares and maintains a SSC candidate list of wildlife species that it considers at risk of extinction or extirpation nationally. Species on the SSC candidate lists are ranked into three priority groups by the SSCs to reflect the relative urgency with which each wildlife species should receive a COSEWIC assessment.

  • Group 1 contains wildlife species of highest priority for assessment by COSEWIC, and includes wildlife species suspected to be extirpated from Canada.
  • Groups 2 and 3 contain wildlife species that are of intermediate and lower priority for COSEWIC assessment, respectively.

Rationales for inclusion of wildlife species on the SSC candidate lists differ among the taxonomic groups considered by COSEWIC, reflecting the vast differences in their life history, and differences in our knowledge about the species.

Wildlife species in bold have been selected by COSEWIC for assessment and are currently planned for inclusion in a future call for bids.

Common name Scientific name Canadian range / known or potential jurisdictions

Amphibians (25)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Canadian Toad Anaxyrus hemiophrys AB, CWS, MB, NT, Parks, SK
Plains Spadefoot Spea bombifrons AB, CWS, MB, Parks, SK
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Northwestern Salamander Ambystoma gracile BC, CWS, Parks
Cope's Grey Treefrog Dryophytes chrysoscelis CWS, MB, Parks
Ensatina Ensatina eschscholtzii BC, CWS, Parks
Four-toed Salamander Hemidactylium scutatum CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, QC
Eastern Red-backed Salamander Plethodon cinereus CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Columbia Spotted Frog Rana luteiventris AB, BC, CWS, Parks, WMAC-NS, YFWMB , YT
Pickerel Frog Rana palustris CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Rough-skinned Newt Taricha granulosa BC, CWS, Parks
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Blue-spotted Salamander Ambystoma laterale CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Long-toed Salamander Ambystoma macrodactylum AB, BC, CWS, Parks
Spotted Salamander Ambystoma maculatum CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
American Toad Anaxyrus americanus CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Northern Two-lined Salamander Eurycea bislineata CWS, NL, ON, Parks, QC
Gray Treefrog Hyla versicolor CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
American Bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Green Frog Lithobates clamitans CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Mink Frog Lithobates septentrionalis CWS, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Wood Frog Lithobates sylvaticus AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Eastern Newt Notophthalmus viridescens CWS, NB, NL, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Western Red-backed Salamander Plethodon vehiculum BC, CWS, Parks
Spring Peeper Pseudacris crucifer CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Boreal Chorus Frog Pseudacris maculata AB, BC, CWS, MB, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Northern Pacific Treefrog Pseudacris regilla BC, CWS, Parks

Arthropods (99)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Hoary Edge Achalarus lyciades CWS, ON, Parks
Sable Island Cutworm Moth Agrotis arenarius CWS, NS, Parks
Oslar's Roadside Skipper Amblyscirtes oslari AB, CMN, CWS, Parks, SK
Lupine Leafroller Moth Anacampsis lupinella CMN, CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Andrena caerulea BC, CWS, Parks
Sable Island Bordered Apamea Apamea sordens sableana CMN, CWS, NS, Parks
Protean Shieldback Atlanticus testaceus CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Calliopsis scitula BC, CWS, Parks
Johnson's Hairstreak Callophrys johnsoni BC, CWS, Parks
Pacific Coast Tiger Beetle Cicindela bellisimi BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Copablepharon viridisparsa AB, CWS, MB, Parks, SK
White-winged Grasshopper Dissosteira spurcata BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Ephalus latimanus CWS, Parks
Sable Island Eucosma Eucosma sableana CWS, NS, Parks
Nevada Buckmoth Hemileuca nevadensis AB, CWS, MB, Parks, SK
Pahaska Skipper Hesperia pahaska CMN, CWS, MB, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Hystrichopsylla schefferi BC, CWS, Parks
Paintedhand Mudbug Lacunicambarus polychromatus CMN, CWS, ON, Parks
Pacific Lasiopogon Lasiopogon pacificus BC, CWS, Parks
Edith's Copper Lycaena editha AB, BC, CWS, Parks
Strecker's Giant Skipper Megathymus streckeri AB, CWS, Parks
Gaspe Grasshopper Melanoplus gaspesiensis CWS, Parks, QC
Simius Roadside Skipper Notamblyscirtes simius CMN, CWS, Parks, SK
Valley Grasshopper Oedaleontus enigma BC, CWS, Parks
Large-lipped Sand Beetle Omophron labiatum CWS, NS, Parks
White-marked Tussock Moth (Sable Island spp.) Orgyia leucostigma sablensis CWS, Parks
Golden Borer Moth Papaipema cerina CWS, ON, Parks
Sable Island Borer Papaipema sp. CWS, NS, Parks
Indra Swallowtail subspecies Papilio indra indra BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Canadian Philaronia Philaronia canadensis CWS, ON, Parks
Long-spined Jerusalem Cricket Stenopelmatus longispinus BC, CWS, Parks
Sable Island Leaf Beetle Tricholochmaea sablensis CWS, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Triepeolus brittaini CWS, NB, NS, Parks, PE
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Barren's Dagger Moth Acronicta albarufa CWS, MB, ON, Parks
Beller's Ground Beetle Agonum belleri BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Andrena edwardsi BC, CWS, Parks
Parasitic Wasp Apantes samarshalli CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Argyresthia flexilis AB, BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Austrotyla borealis AB, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Bombus morrisoni BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Bombus vandykei BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Bombus variabilis CWS, Parks, QC
Moss's Elfin Callophrys mossii BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Cambarus bartonii CWS, NB, ON, Parks, QC
Whitney's Underwing Catocala whitneyi CWS, MB, Parks
Hoffmann's Checkerspot Chlosyne hoffmanni BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Coleotechnites lewisi AB, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Copablepharon hopfingerii BC, CWS, Parks
Eastern Tailed Blue (British Columbia population) Cupido comyntas BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Dendrotettix quercus CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Dicromantispa sayi CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Dufourea monardae CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Ellipes gurneyi CWS, ON, Parks
Ghost Tiger Beetle Ellipsoptera lepida AB, CWS, MB, ON, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Eristalis brousii CWS, Parks
Propertius Duskywing Erynnis propertius BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Eumenes bollii CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Euxoa unica CWS, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Hesperotettix viridis BC, CWS, Parks
Carr's Diving Beetle Hydroporus carri AB, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Hyperaspis brunnescens CWS, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Lasioglossum yukonae BC, CWS, Parks, YT
(common name not available) Lasionycta macleani BC, CWS, Parks
Minor Ground Mantid Litaneutria minor AB, BC, CWS, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Lypoglossa manitobae CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Megaphorus willistoni BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Melanoplus digitifer BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Melanoplus rugglesi BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Melanoplus scudderi CWS, ON, Parks
Rocky Mountain Grasshopper Melanoplus spretus AB, CWS, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Melanoplus walshii CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Metator nevadensis BC, CWS, Parks
Contracted Bombing Beetle Metrius contractus contractus BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Naemia seriata CWS, NB, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Nebria charlottae BC, CWS, Parks
Gwaii Haanas Ground Beetle Nebria louisae BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Nephus intrusus CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Nicocles rufus BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Oecanthus laricis CWS, ON, Parks
Gaspé Arctic Oeneis bore gaspeensis CWS, Parks, QC
(common name not available) Omus dejeanii BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Pachybrachis calcaratus CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Philonthus turbo CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Polites rhesus CWS, Parks
Sandhill Skipper Polites sabuleti BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Prosimulium doveri BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Scaphinotus merkeli BC, CWS, Parks
False Indigo Flower Moth Schinia lucens CWS, MB, Parks
(common name not available) Scymnus cervicalis CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Scymnus fraternus CWS, ON, Parks, QC
(common name not available) Scymnus securus CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Sogda enigma CWS, Parks
Bremner's Zerene Fritillary Speyeria zerene bremnerii BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Stereus arenarius AB, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Stichopogon fragilis BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Stygobromus quatsinensis BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Trichiusa robustula CWS, ON, Parks
Olympic Peninsula Millipede Tubaphe levii BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Xanthorhoe clarkeata BC, CWS, Parks

Birds (32)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Ruddy Turnstone, morinella subspecies Arenaria interpres morinella CWS, NT, NU, Parks, YT
Snowy Owl Bubo scandiacus AB, ARRC, BC, CMN, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, EMRWB, GRRB, HFTCC, IGC, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, NB, NL, NMRWB, NS, NT, NU, NWC, NWMB, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, SRRB, SRRC, TRRC, TWPCB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YFWMB, YT
Sanderling Calidris alba AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Dunlin Calidris alpina AB, BC, CMN, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Stilt Sandpiper Calidris himantopus AB, CWS, MB, NT, NU, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Pectoral Sandpiper Calidris melanotos AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Semipalmated Sandpiper Calidris pusilla AB, BC, CWS, HFTCC, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, NWMB, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, YT
Gray-cheeked Thrush (minimus subspecies) Catharus minimus minimus CWS, NL, Parks
Killdeer Charadrius vociferus AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Horned Lark Eremophila alpestris AB, ARRC, BC, CMN, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, EMRWB, GRRB, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, NB, NJFMC, NL, NMRWB, NS, NT, NU, NWC, NWMB, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PCMB, PE, QC, SK, SRRB, SRRC, TRRC, TWPCB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YFWMB, YT
Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Connecticut Warbler Oporornis agilis AB, BC, CWS, MB, NT, NU, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
LeConte's Sparrow Ammospiza leconteii AB, BC, CWS, MB, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Upland Sandpiper Bartramia longicauda AB, ARRC, BC, CMN, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, NB, NT, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, SRRC, TRRC, YFWMB, YT
Long-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus scolopaceus AB, BC, CWS, MB, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Leach's Storm-Petrel (Pacfic population) Oceanodroma leucorhoa not available
American Golden-plover Pluvialis dominica AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Black-bellied Plover, cynosura subspecies Pluvialis squatarola cynosura CWS, NT, NU, Parks
Purple Martin Progne subis AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Blackpoll Warbler Setophaga striata AB, ARRC, BC, CMN, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, EMRWB, GRRB, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, NB, NL, NMRWB, NS, NT, NU, NWC, NWMB, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PCMB, PE, QC, SK, SRRB, SRRC, TRRC, TWPCB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YFWMB, YT
Arctic Tern Sterna paradisaea AB, ARRC, BC, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, EMRWB, GRRB, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, NB, NJFMC, NL, NMRWB, NS, NT, NU, NWC, NWMB, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PCMB, PE, QC, SK, SRRB, SRRC, TWPCB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YT
Bewick's Wren Thryomanes bewickii BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Wandering Tattler Tringa incana BC, CWS, NT, Parks, YT
Pacific Wren Troglodytes pacificus AB, BC, CMN, CWS, Parks, YT
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Black Tern Chlidonias niger AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, WRRB
Western Wood-Pewee Contopus sordidulus AB, BC, CMN, CWS, MB, NT, Parks, SK, YT
Brewer's Blackbird Euphagus cyanocephalus AB, BC, CMN, CWS, MB, NT, ON, Parks, SK
American Kestrel Falco sparverius AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Yellow-billed Loon Gavia adamsii AB, BC, CWS, GRRB, MB, NT, NU, NWMB, Parks, QC, SRRB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YFWMB, YT
Laysan Albatross Phoebastria immutabilis BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Buller's Shearwater Puffinus bulleri BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Pine Siskin Spinus pinus AB, ARRC, BC, CMN, CRRC, CTRRC, CWS, DDRRC, DKRRC, EMRWB, GRRB, HFTCC, LRRC, MB, MDRRC, MNJFC, NB, NL, NMRWB, NS, NT, NWC, NYRRC, ON, Parks, PCMB, PE, QC, SK, SRRB, SRRC, TRRC, TWPCB, WMAC-NS, WMAC-NWT, WRRB, YFWMB, YT

Freshwater Fishes (69)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis AB, BC, CWS, DFO, FJMC, GRRB, HFTCC, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, NWMB, ON, Parks, QC, SK, SRRB, YFWMB, YT
European Whitefish Coregonus lavaretus CWS, DFO, NT, Parks, YT
Blackfin Cisco Coregonus nigripinnis CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Pacific Lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks
Banded Killifish (Mainland populations) Fundulus diaphanus CWS, DFO, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC
Chestnut Lamprey (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence populations) Ichthyomyzon castaneus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Blackchin Shiner Notropis heterodon CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Coastal Cutthroat Trout Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii BC, CWS, DFO, NJFMC, Parks, YT
Landlocked Arctic Char Salvelinus alpinus CWS, DFO, FJMC, GRRB, HFTCC, MB, NB, NL, NT, NU, NWMB, Parks, QC, SRRB, YFWMB, YT
Arctic Grayling (Western Arctic populations) Thymallus arcticus AB, BC, CWS, DFO, MB, NT, NU, Parks, SK, YT
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Cisco (Lake Herring) Coregonus artedi AB, BC, CWS, DFO, MB, NT, NU, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Arctic Cisco Coregonus autumnalis BC, CWS, DFO, NT, NU, Parks, YT
Least Cisco Coregonus sardinella BC, CWS, DFO, NT, NU, Parks, YT
Redbreast Sunfish Lepomis auritus CWS, DFO, NB, Parks
Northern Sunfish (Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations) Lepomis peltastes CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Silver Redhorse Moxostoma anisurum AB, CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Golden Redhorse Moxostoma erythrurum CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks
Greater Redhorse Moxostoma valenciennesi CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Fourhorn Sculpin (Freshwater form) Myoxocephalus quadricornis CWS, DFO, FJMC, NL, NT, NU, NWMB, Parks, WRRB
Hornyhead Chub Nocomis biguttatus CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks
Brindled Madtom Noturus miurus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Bull Trout (Upper Yukon Watershed populations) Salvelinus confluentus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, YT
Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Inconnu Stenodus leucichthys BC, CWS, DFO, NT, Parks, YT
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Chiselmouth Acrocheilus alutaceus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks
Yellow Bullhead Ameiurus natalis CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Central Stoneroller Campostoma anomalum CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Quillback Carpiodes cyprinus AB, CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Lake Whitefish (Mira River populations) Coregonus clupeaformis CWS, DFO, NS, Parks
Lake Whitefish (Simcoe Lake populations) Coregonus clupeaformis CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Bloater Coregonus hoyi CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Broad Whitefish Coregonus nasus BC, CWS, DFO, NT, NU, Parks, YT
Slimy Sculpin Cottus cognatus AB, BC, CWS, DFO, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK, YT
Spoonhead Sculpin Cottus ricei AB, BC, CWS, DFO, FJMC, GRRB, HFTCC, MB, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, SRRB, WRRB, YFWMB, YT
Redfin Pickerel Esox americanus americanus CWS, DFO, Parks, QC
Muskellunge Esox masquinongy CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Chain Pickerel Esox niger CWS, DFO, Parks, QC
Greenside Darter Etheostoma blennioides CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Rainbow Darter Etheostoma caeruleum CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Least Darter Etheostoma microperca CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Tessellated Darter Etheostoma olmstedi CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Eastern Silvery Minnow Hybognathus regius CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Chestnut Lamprey (Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations) Ichthyomyzon castaneus CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, SK
Bigmouth Buffalo (Great Lakes - Upper St. Lawrence Populations) Ictiobus cyprinellus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Black Buffalo Ictiobus niger CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Brook Silverside Labidesthes sicculus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Green Sunfish Lepomis cyanellus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Alaskan Brook Lamprey Lethenteron alaskense CWS, DFO, NT, Parks
Striped Shiner Luxilus chrysocephalus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Redfin Shiner Lythrurus umbratilis CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Silver Chub (Saskatchewan - Nelson River populations) Macrhybopsis storeriana CWS, DFO, MB, Parks
Northern Pearl Dace Margariscus nachtiebi AB, BC, CWS, DFO, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK
River Chub Nocomis micropogon CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
River Shiner Notropis blennius AB, CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, SK
Ghost Shiner Notropis buchanani CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Bigmouth Shiner Notropis dorsalis CWS, DFO, MB, Parks
Rosyface Shiner Notropis rubellus CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Weed Shiner Notropis texanus CWS, DFO, MB, Parks
Margined Madtom Noturus insignis CWS, DFO, ON, Parks, QC
Blackside Darter Percina maculata CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, SK
Bluntnose Minnow Pimephales notatus CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Round Whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum AB, BC, CWS, DFO, FJMC, GRRB, HFTCC, MB, NB, NL, NT, NU, NWMB, ON, Parks, QC, SK, SRRB, YFWMB, YT
Flathead Catfish Pylodictis olivaris CWS, DFO, ON, Parks
Eastern Blacknose Dace Rhinichthys atratulus CWS, DFO, NB, ON, Parks, QC
Leopard Dace Rhinichthys falcatus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks
Western Blacknose Dace Rhinichthys obtusus CWS, DFO, MB, ON, Parks, SK
Bull Trout (Pacific populations) Salvelinus confluentus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks
Lake Trout Salvelinus namaycush AB, CWS, DFO, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Longfin Smelt Spirinchus thaleichthys BC, CWS, DFO, Parks

Lichens (33)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Wright's Spotted Felt Lichen Dendriscosticta wrightii BC, CWS, Parks
Vole Felt Lichen Erioderma sorediatum BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Lichenoidium sirosiphoidium BC, CWS, NL, Parks
White Fringe Lichen Moelleropsis nebulosa CWS, NB, NL, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Parmeliella parvula BC, CWS, NL, NS, Parks
Powdered Moon Lichen (Eastern population) Sticta limbata CWS, NB, NS, Parks, QC
Arctic Orangebush Lichen Xanthaptychia aurantiaca CMN, CWS, NT, Parks
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Whiskered Millipede Lichen Anaptychia elbursiana AB, BC, CWS, Parks
Flexuous Golden Stubble Chaenotheca servitii CWS, NS, Parks
Hemlock Stubble Chaenothecopsis tsugae CWS, Parks
Desert Tumbleweed Lichen Circinaria hispida AB, BC, CWS, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Fuscopannaria ahlneri BC, CWS, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Fuscopannaria coralloidea BC, CWS, Parks
Desert Rock-scab Glypholecia scabra BC, CWS, NT, NU, Parks, SK
(common name not available) Pannaria tavaresii CWS, NS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Peltula euploca BC, CWS, Parks
Red Oak Stubble Phaeocalicium minutissimum CWS, NB, Parks, QC
Crannied Orangebush Lichen Seirophora contortuplicata AB, BC, CWS, NT, Parks, YT
(common name not available) Sticta canariensis CWS, ON, Parks
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
(common name not available) Bryoria carlottae BC, CWS, Parks
Mottled Horsehair Lichen Bryoria cervinula BC, CWS, NT, Parks
Rosin Whiskers Chaenothecopsis oregana AB, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Dermatocarpon dolomiticum CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Gypsoplaca macrophylla AB, BC, CWS, NT, Parks, YT
(common name not available) Heppia adglutianata CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Leptogium corticola CWS, NS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Leptogium hibernicum CWS, NS, Parks
(common name not available) Niebla cephalota BC, CWS, Parks
Ghost Antler Lichen Pseudevernia cladonia CWS, NB, NS, Parks, QC
Antler Lichen Pseudevernia consocians AB, CWS, MB, NS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Punctelia borreri CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Sclerophora amabilis BC, CWS, NB, Parks
(common name not available) Thyrea confusa BC, CWS, ON, Parks, QC

Marine fishes (14)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Pink Salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta BC, CWS, DFO, NT, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Chum Salmon (Skeena River populations) Oncorhynchus keta BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Chinook Salmon (Skeena River populations) Oncorhynchus tshawytscha BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Chinook Salmon (Yukon River and transboundary populations) Oncorhynchus tshawytscha BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean, YT
Atlantic Mackerel Scomber scombrus Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, Parks
Greenland Shark Somniosus microcephalus Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, Parks
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Alewife Alosa pseudoharengus Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, Parks
American Shad Alosa sapidissima Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, NB, NS, Parks, PE, QC
Pacific Herring Clupea pallissii BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Yellowtail Flounder Limanda ferruginea Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, NB, NL, NS, Parks, PE
Pollock Pollachius virens Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, NB, NL, NS, Parks
Widow Rockfish Sebastes entomelas BC, CWS, DFO, NJFMC, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Shortspine Thornyhead Sebastolobus alascanus BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean

Marine mammals (9)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Guadalupe Fur Seal Arctocephalus townsendi CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Baird's Beaked Whale Berardius bairdii CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Pacific White-sided Dolphin Lagenorhynchus obliquidens CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Cuvier's Beaked Whale Ziphius cavirostris Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Hooded Seal Cystophora cristata Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, NU, NWMB, Parks
Bearded Seal Erignathus barbatus Arctic Ocean, CWS, DFO, FJMC, HFTCC, MB, NL, NT, NU, NWMB, ON, Parks, QC, YT
Sperm Whale Physeter macrocephalus CWS, DFO, NWMB, Parks
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Northern Elephant Seal Mirounga angustirostris BC, CWS, DFO, Parks, Pacific Ocean
Harp Seal Phoca groenlandica Arctic Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, CWS, DFO, NL, Parks

Molluscs (38)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Ashy Pebblesnail Fluminicola fuscus BC, CWS, Parks
Boreal Awningclam Solemya borealis Atlantic Ocean, CWS, Parks
Bronze Pinecone Strobilops aeneus CWS, ON, Parks
Pyramid Dome Ventridens intertextus CWS, ON, Parks
Globose Dome Ventridens ligera CWS, ON, Parks
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Globe Siltsnail Birgella subglobosa CWS, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Bugle Sprite Micromenetus dilatatus CWS, NS, Parks
Boundary Mountainsnail Oreohelix subrudis limitaris AB, CWS, Parks
Blunt Albino Physa Physella gyrina athearni AB, CWS, Parks
Ornamented Peaclam Pisidium cruciatum CWS, ON, Parks
Corpulent Rams-horn Planorbella corpulenta CWS, MB, ON, Parks
Whiteaves's Capacious Rams-horn Planorbella corpulenta whiteavesi CWS, ON, Parks
Western Arctic Stagnicola Stagnicola kennicotti CWS, NT, NU, Parks
Loosely-coiled Valve Snail Valvata lewisi ontariensis CWS, ON, Parks
Flat Dome Ventridens suppressus CWS, ON, Parks
Velvet Wedge Xolotrema denotatum CWS, ON, Parks
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Spindle Lymnaea Acella haldemani CWS, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Slippershell Alasmidonta viridis CWS, ON, Parks
Slippershell Alasmidonta viridis CWS, ON, Parks
Pimpleback Cyclonaias pustulosa CWS, ON, Parks
Bark Snaggletooth Gastrocopta corticaria CWS, NB, ON, Parks, QC
Lake Superior Rams-horn Helisoma anceps royalense CWS, MB, ON, Parks
Flutedshell Lasmigona costata CWS, MB, ON, Parks, QC
Tidewater Mucket Leptodea ochracea CWS, NB, NS, Parks
Eastern Pearl Mussel Margaritifera margaritifera CWS, NB, NL, NS, Parks, PE, QC
Yellow Globelet Mesodon clausus CWS, ON, Parks
Rotund Physa Physella columbiana BC, CWS, Parks
Haldeman's Physa Physella concolor BC, CWS, Parks
Grain physa Physella hordacea BC, CWS, DFO, Parks
Twisted Physa Physella lordi AB, BC, CWS, Parks
Nuttall's Physa Physella nuttalli BC, CWS, Parks
Tiny Peaclam Pisidium insigne AB, BC, CWS, ON, Parks, PE
Slender Walker Pomatiopsis lapidaria CWS, ON, Parks
Mountain Marshsnail Stagnicola montanensis AB, CWS, Parks
Calabash Pondsnail Stagnicola walkeriana CWS, ON, Parks
Coldwater Pondsnail Stagnicola woodruffi CWS, ON, Parks
Deertoe Truncilla truncata CWS, ON, Parks
Purplecap Valvata Valvata perdepressa CWS, ON, Parks

Mosses (20)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Orkney Notchwort Anastrepta orcadensis BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Apotreubia hortoniae BC, CWS, Parks
Velenovsky's Moss Hilpertia velenovskyi BC, CWS, NT, NU, Parks
Woods Whipwort Mastigophora woodsii BC, CWS, Parks
(common name not available) Sphagnum cyclophyllum CWS, NS, Parks
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Great Bear Lake Sieve-tooth Moss Coscinodon arctolimnius CWS, NT, Parks
(common name not available) Gollania turgens BC, CWS, Parks, YT
(common name not available) Trematodon asanoi BC, CWS, Parks
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Pacific Volcano Moss Brachydontium olympicum BC, CWS, Parks, YT
(common name not available) Buxbaumia minakatae CWS, NL, NS, ON, Parks
Blunted Earwort Diplophyllum obtusatum CWS, NL, ON, Parks, QC
Schleicher's Silk Moss Entodon schleicheri AB, BC, CWS, NT, Parks
(common name not available) Fabronia ciliaris CWS, MB, Parks
Pygmy Pocket Moss Fissidens exilis BC, CWS, NS, ON, Parks, QC
River Scalewort Frullania riparia CWS, Parks, QC
Funaria Moss Funaria flavicans CWS, ON, Parks
Mountain Brook Moss Hygrohypnum montanum CWS, NB, NL, NS, Parks, PE, QC
Delicate Luster Moss Isopterygium tenerum CWS, NS, Parks
Porter's Twisted Moss Tortula porteri CWS, ON, Parks
(common name not available) Trematodon longicollis CWS, ON, Parks

Reptiles (12)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
No candidates currently listed
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Ring-necked Snake Diadophis punctatus CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, QC
Smooth Greensnake Opheodrys vernalis CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, PE, QC, SK
Plains Gartersnake Thamnophis radix AB, CWS, MB, Parks, SK
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas CWS, Parks
Northern Alligator Lizard Elgaria coerulea BC, CWS, Parks
Kemp's Ridley Sea Turtle Lepidochelys kempii Atlantic Ocean, CWS, NS, Parks
Northern watersnake Nerodia sipedon sipedon CWS, ON, Parks, QC
DeKay's Brownsnake Storeria dekayi CWS, ON, Parks, QC
Red-bellied Snake Storeria occipitomaculata CWS, MB, NB, NS, ON, Parks, QC
Terrestrial Gartersnake Thamnophis elegans AB, BC, CWS, Parks
Northwestern Gartersnake Thamnophis ordinoides BC, CWS, Parks
Common Gartersnake Thamnophis sirtalis AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK

Terrestrial mammals (7)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Silver-haired Bat Lasionycteris noctivagans AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Eastern Red Bat Lasiurus borealis AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK
Hoary Bat Lasiurus cinereus AB, BC, CWS, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, Parks, QC, SK, YT
Great Basin Pocket Mouse Perognathus parvus BC, CWS, Parks
Group 2 - Mid priority candidates
Dall's Sheep Ovis dallii ATK-SC, BC, CMN, CWS, NT, Parks, YT
Group 3 - Low priority candidates
Stone's Sheep Ovis dallii stonei ATK-SC, BC, CMN, CWS, Parks, YT
Western Spotted Skunk Spilogale gracilis BC, CWS, Parks

Vascular plants (12)

Group 1 - High priority candidates
Alpine Lady's-mantle Alchemilla alpina CWS, NL, Parks, QC
Pine Broomrape Aphyllon pinorum BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Smooth Clustered Sedge Carex aggregata CWS, ON, Parks
Black-edged Sedge Carex nigromarginata CWS, ON, Parks
Rough-leaved Aster Eurybia radulina BC, CWS, Parks
Short-fruited Rush Juncus brachycarpus CWS, ON, Parks
Cleland's Evening-primrose Oenothera clelandii CWS, ON, Parks
Pale Evening-primrose Oenothera pallida pallida BC, CMN, CWS, Parks
Prairie Rosinweed Silphium terebinthinaceum CMN, CWS, ON, Parks
Dune Goldenrod Solidago simplex CWS, NB, ON, Parks
Forked Bluecurls Trichostema dichotomum CWS, NS, ON, Parks, QC
Dwarf Western Trillium Trilium ovatum hibbersonii BC, CWS, Parks
Group 2 - mid priority candidates and group 3 - low priority candidates
An expanded vascular plants candidate list of over 500 vascular plants, grouped into two priority classes, is now available to the public in an excel worksheet file. This list is provided with the understanding that it is a working copy undergoing modification. In preparing the list, information from the General Status of Species in Canada review process, undertaken by all federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions, is taken into account when species are ranked for inclusion on the list.

Please contact the COSEWIC secretariat for a copy of the list at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

About us

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) is an independent advisory panel to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada that meets twice a year to assess the status of wildlife species at risk of extinction. Members are wildlife biology experts from academia, government, non-governmental organizations and the private sector responsible for designating wildlife species in danger of disappearing from Canada.

COSEWIC secretariat

Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 St. Joseph Blvd, 16th floor
Gatineau QC K1A 0H3

Telephone: 819-938-4125
Fax: 819-938-3984
Email: ec.cosepac-cosewic.ec@canada.ca