COSEWIC call for bids for status reports or designatable unit report: Fall 2019

Experts Are Needed to Write a COSEWIC Status Report or a COSEWIC Designatable Unit Report

We are accepting bids between NOVEMBER 6 – DECEMBER 11, 2019

Deadline: December 11 at 3pm Eastern time

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Part 1: Introduction

COSEWIC is seeking experts from both the public and private sectors to produce a status report or a designatable unit report. COSEWIC status reports summarize the scientific, community and Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (ATK) that is the basis for status determinations. Each report is an up-to-date compilation and analysis of all available biological information concerning a wildlife species’ status in Canada, including its distribution, abundance, habitat availability, and factors or threats limiting the wildlife species. COSEWIC may also identify Designatable Units (DU) below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance. DU reports form the basis of a subsequent assessment for the wildlife species.

Updates to status reports for wildlife species that have existing COSEWIC designations may draw on information from the previous report(s) and will provide the basis for future updated reports on the wildlife species.

Applicants are asked to submit bids for a contract to produce a status report for the wildlife species from Part 2 below or a designatable unit report from Part 3 below. COSEWIC will only accept bids for single status reports or designatable unit reports, unless Part 2 or Part 3 specifically asks for bids on more than one wildlife species. For applications submitted by more than one person, the roles of each person in the preparation of the report must be clearly explained, and the names and roles of all persons who will be involved should be included. Note that general or species-specific corrections or clarifications to the Call for Bids may be posted on the COSEWIC website; applicants should check the website for updates until the close of the Call for Bids. For instructions on how to submit a bid and for information about the conditions and requirements involved, please see Part 4 below.

The wildlife species for which a status report will be commissioned is shown in Part 2 below. The year of designation and the current COSEWIC risk category are indicated. The wildlife species for which a designatable unit report will be commissioned is shown in Part 3 below. The suggested value of the contract is provided as a guide for applicants in developing their proposals. The number of designatable units planned for inclusion in a status report is based on best available information. It should be noted that the number of designatable units in a status report can change leading up to the letting of a contract and/or once a contract is underway. Information on the COSEWIC designatable guidelines can be found at COSEWIC guidelines for recognizing designatable units.

Note: Any reports commissioned by COSEWIC exceeding $40,000 will be posted on the, Government Electronic Tendering Service, and not on a COSEWIC call for bids. Postings on BuyandSell.gc.ca do not necessarily coincide with the posting dates for COSEWIC calls for bids.


 

Part 2: Wildlife species for which a COSEWIC status report is needed

NOVEMBER 6 – DECEMBER 11, 2019

Deadline: Wednesday, December 11 at 3pm Eastern time

 
Scientific name Common name Range in Canada Current COSEWIC status Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft

Amphibians

For the two populations of Western Chorus Frog* **

Pseudacris triseriata Western Chorus Frog (Carolinian population) ON Not at Risk (April 2008) $15,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
Western Chorus Frog (Great Lakes / St. Lawrence - Canadian Shield population) ON, QC Threatened (April 2008)
*Note that the assessment is for the Western Chorus Frog designatable units, as identified in the previous report. However, the scope will include assessing the validity of those designatable units based on new genetic information for both the Boreal (Pseudacris maculata) and Western Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris triseriata). Bidders for the Western Chorus Frog should be prepared to examine and utilize source information in both English and French and should be able to understand and interpret genetic information.
**An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.

Arthropods

Report writers for all arthropods reports will need:

  1. for those species that require fieldwork
    1. do or arrange for fieldwork to verify whether the wildlife species as well as suitable habitat are still present at some or all locations from which the wildlife species had been recorded previously,
    2. to check appropriate habitat in an area where the wildlife species may be expected,
    3. to include an appendix documenting the field work including: detailed locality data on sites visited, and survey techniques (this is considered the field report), and
    4. provide material evidence of occurrence, preferably at least one voucher specimen per extant locality deposited in a recognized public institution (e.g., Canadian National Collection, and other entomological collections in the country), or photographic evidence if this can be obtained without undue disturbance;
  2. estimate, if possible, trends in abundance of the wildlife species over ten year time intervals using museum datasets, citizen science data, or other research information.

Note that access to private properties for survey purposes requires landowner permission. Report writers should obtain additional information from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

For Hornless Oakworm Moth

Anisota finlaysoni Hornless Oakworm Moth ON New $11,000.00
Fall 2020
This moth is known from a limited range in southeastern Ontario, where it inhabits oak woodland and dry forest edges. The adult flight period is June - July. The report writer must compile all known records of the moth and define the potential range of its larval hosts (primarily white oak, but also chestnut oak and bur oak). Fieldwork is required for this species; the report writer must be willing to complete surveys in historical sites along the northeastern shore of Lake Ontario and potential sites in the Niagara Peninsula. The report writer must compile threats to the species habitat during fieldwork, and the recent search effort for this moth should be compiled and if possible quantified, including null search effort.

For Johnson's Hairstreak

Callophrys johnsoni Johnson's Hairstreak BC New $11,000.00
Fall 2020
This small brown butterfly ranges in the lower elevation old growth forests on the west coast of British Columbia. The larvae depend exclusively on exposed Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe (fungus), which tends to grow at the tops or sun-exposed parts of Western Hemlock stands. The species appears to have declined due to logging of old growth timber, and active management to control Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe, thereby limiting its habitat. The report writer will be expected to compile new search effort, records, population information, and additional data for a status report.

For Duke's Skipper

Euphyes dukesi Duke's Skipper ON New $11,000.00
Fall 2020
This small orangish-brown butterfly has a limited and localized Canadian range in southwestern Ontario. The species is restricted to shady graminoid marshy areas adjacent to, or within woodlands although it has been observed rarely in dry ditches containing larval foodplants. Unlike most other sedge skippers, it is rarely found in open marshes. Adults are active from mid-June to late August and are usually associated with patches of sedge (Carex spp.). The report writer must compile information on all known records, search effort, and potential habitat. Fieldwork is required to confirm the known sites and document threats and habitat trends at those sites.

For Oak Hairstreak

Satyrium favonius Oak Hairstreak ON New $11,000.00
Fall 2020
The Oak Hairstreak, represented in Canada has a very restricted distribution in intact oak woodlands of southern Ontario. Historical sites include Port Stanley, Grimsby, and Point Pelee National Park; and at least one extant subpopulation at Reid Conservation Area, and several other recent sightings in Lambton Co. and Essex Co. The larvae feed on white oak and other closely related oaks, and habitat with these species has declined dramatically from historical levels. The report writer is expected to compile all new records, conduct surveys at known and nearby sites of suitable habitat, and document threats and habitat trends at those sites. The report writer must also compile recent search effort for this butterfly, including negative searches, and any additional, pertinent research.

For Rusty-patched Bumble Bee

Bombus affinis Rusty-patched Bumble Bee NB, ON, QC Endangered (April 2010) $9,000.00
Summer 2020
A ten-year status reassessment of Rusty-patch Bumble Bee is required; there is substantial new information since the previous status assessment. The most recent observation of this bumble bee in Canada is 2009. Since the initial status report, an older record for the species was confirmed from New Brunswick. Fieldwork is not required but the report writer is expected to seek out likely sources of additional information and observations within the area of the range extension, including those within New Brunswick and other maritime provinces. The report writer must compile all known records of the bumble bee and examine dubious records and specimens for any errors and include recent search effort for the species.

For Dusky Dune Moth

Copablepharon longipenne Dusky Dune Moth AB, MB, SK Endangered (November 2007) $11,000.00
Fall 2020
A ten-year status reassessment of Dusky Dune Moth is required; there is substantial new information since the previous status assessment including new subpopulations, habitat and biological information. The species is restricted to open, active sand areas that are both fragmented and declining. The report writer is expected to compile new information, including prairie sandhill and sand ecosystem habitat trends as they relate to the decline in habitat for the moth, and seek additional information from regional specialists, experts and jurisdictional biologists. Fieldwork is required at some of the historical sites and a list of the sites the report writer intends to visit is requested as part of the bid evaluation.

For Skillet Clubtail

Gomphus ventricosus Skillet Clubtail NB, NS, ON, QC Endangered (November 2010) $15,000.00
Fall 2020
A ten-year status reassessment of Skillet Clubtail is required; there is substantial new information since the previous status assessment. The species was recently recorded from the Saugeen River in Ontario and the Batiscan and Beauce rivers in Quebec. It is also known from the Saint John River and a few of its tributaries in New Brunswick, a single historical record from "Ottawa" and is known from the US side of the Rainy River which borders Rainy River District in Ontario, and additional records for Nova Scotia. The report writer is expected to compile all new information, including contacting experts and jurisdictional biologists, quantify the search effort within each province and update the threats to include the new subpopulations. At a minimum, fieldwork is required in Ontario along the Saugeen River, Ottawa River and Rainy River. These three areas require travel, and a detailed field plan is requested as part of the bid submission. Fieldwork costs can be no greater than 1/3 of the contract value.

Birds

For Short-billed Dowitcher

Limnodromus griseus Short-billed Dowitcher AB, BC, MB, NB, NL, NS, NT, NU, ON, PE, QC, SK, YT New $12,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Bicknell's Thrush

Catharus bicknelli Bicknell's Thrush NB, NS, QC Threatened (November 2009) $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Ivory Gull*

Pagophila eburnea Ivory Gull NL, NT, NU, YT Endangered (April 2006) $8,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For the two populations of Horned Grebe

Podiceps auritus 1. Horned Grebe (Magdalen Islands population) 1. QC 1. Endangered (April 2009) $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Horned Grebe (Western population) 2. AB, BC, MB, NT, NU, ON, SK, YT 2. Special Concern (April 2009)

*An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.

Freshwater fishes

For the two populations of Atlantic Sturgeon

Acipenser oxyrinchus 1. Atlantic Sturgeon (Maritimes populations) 1. Atlantic Ocean, NB, NS 1. Threatened (May 2011) $16,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Atlantic Sturgeon (St. Lawrence populations) 2. Atlantic Ocean, NL, PE, QC 2. Threatened (May 2011)

For the three populations of Striped Bass*

Morone saxatilis 1. Striped Bass (Bay of Fundy population) 1. Atlantic Ocean, NB, NS 1. Endangered (November 2012) $16,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Striped Bass (Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence population) 2. NB, NS, PE, QC 2. Special Concern (November 2012)
3. Striped Bass (St. Lawrence River population) 3. QC 3. Endangered (November 2012)
*Note that the assessment includes the Striped Bass designatable units as identified in the previous report. However, the scope will include assessing the validity of those designatable units based on new genetic and movement data. Bidders for the Striped Bass should be prepared to examine and utilize source information in both English and French and should be able to understand and interpret genetic information.

For the four populations of Cisco*

1. Coregonus zenithicus 1. Shortjaw Cisco (Great Lakes population)** *** ON 1. Not currently assessed $18,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Coregonus kiyi kiyi 2. Upper Great Lakes Kiyi 2. Special Concern (May 2005)
3. Coregonus nigripinnis 3. Blackfin Cisco 3. Data Deficient (April 2007)
4. Coregonus spp. 4. Cisco Complexes Great Lakes Cisco 4. New
*Please note that this Status Report will include 26 Designatable Units of Ciscoes in the Great Lakes ecoregion and as such will include Ciscoes in the Great Lakes and in other areas of Ontario. This report will include the designatable units for Shortjaw Cisco, the Upper Great Lakes Kiyi and Blackfin Cisco populations within the Great Lakes ecoregion which were previously assessed by COSEWIC.
**Shortjaw Cisco, as a single designatable unit, was assessed as Threatened in May 2003.
***An ATK report has been prepared for this species. ATK information relevant to the assessments would be shared with COSEWIC Status Report Writer(s) for integration into the status report.

Marine fishes

For the 15 populations of Atlantic Salmon

Salmo salar 1. Atlantic Salmon (Labrador population) 1. Atlantic Ocean, NL, QC 1. Not at Risk (November 2010) $23,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Atlantic Salmon (Northeast Newfoundland population) 2. Atlantic Ocean, NL 2. Not at Risk (November 2010)
3. Atlantic Salmon (South Newfoundland population) 3. Atlantic Ocean, NL 3. Threatened (November 2010)
4. Atlantic Salmon (Southwest Newfoundland population) 4. Atlantic Ocean, NL, QC 4. Not at Risk (November 2010)
5. Atlantic Salmon (Northwest Newfoundland population) 5. Atlantic Ocean, NL 5. Not at Risk (November 2010)
6. Atlantic Salmon (Quebec Eastern North Shore population) 6. Atlantic Ocean, QC 6. Special Concern (November 2010)
7. Atlantic Salmon (Quebec Western North Shore population) 7. Atlantic Ocean, QC 7. Special Concern (November 2010)
8. Atlantic Salmon (Inner St. Lawrence population) 8. Atlantic Ocean, QC 8. Special Concern (November 2010)
9. Atlantic Salmon (Gaspé-Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence population) 9. Atlantic Ocean, NB, NS, PE, QC 9. Special Concern (November 2010)
10. Atlantic Salmon (Eastern Cape Breton population) 10. Atlantic Ocean, NS 10. Endangered (November 2010)
11. Atlantic Salmon (Nova Scotia Southern Upland population) 11. Atlantic Ocean, NS 11. Endangered (November 2010)
12. Atlantic Salmon (Outer Bay of Fundy population) 12. Atlantic Ocean, NB 12. Endangered (November 2010)
13. Atlantic Salmon (Inner Bay of Fundy population) 13. Atlantic Ocean, NB, NS 13. Endangered (November 2010)
14. Atlantic Salmon (Anticosti Island population) 14. Atlantic Ocean, QC 14. Endangered (November 2010)
15. Atlantic Salmon (Nunavik population) 15. Atlantic Ocean, NL, QC 15. Data Deficient (November 2010)

Marine mammals

For Humpback Whale

Megaptera novaeangliae Humpback Whale (North Pacific population) BC, Pacific Ocean Special Concern (May 2011) $12,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

Molluscs

For Big-tooth Whitelip*

Neohelix dentifera Big-tooth Whitelip ON, QC New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Ashy Pebblesnail*

Fluminicola fuscus Ashy Pebblesnail BC New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel

Gonidea angulata Rocky Mountain Ridged Mussel BC Endangered (November 2010) $7,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Hotwater Physa

Physella wrighti Hotwater Physa BC Endangered (April 2008) $8,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

*Field verification of previously occupied sites must be undertaken for Ashy Pebblesnail (Fluminicola fuscus) and Bigtooth Whitelip (Neohelix dentifera). Field verification includes:

  • search known sites for live specimens as well as suitable habitat in the vicinity of known sites;
  • if possible, provide abundance estimates and size class distributions for each major subpopulation;
  • provide a field summary report documenting the field work, including detailed site information and survey methodologies used;
  • deposit at least one voucher specimen per extant site in a recognized public institution or, in situations where collecting live specimens could further endanger a subpopulation, provide photographic evidence.

The value for field verifications cannot exceed one third the contract value.

Mosses and lichens

For Pale-bellied Frost Lichen

Physconia subpallida Pale-bellied Frost Lichen ON Endangered (November 2009) $8,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Apotreubia hortoniae

Apotreubia hortoniae (common name not available) BC New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Sphagnum cyclophyllum

Sphagnum cyclophyllum (common name not available) NS New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Roell's Brotherella Moss

Brotherella roellii Roell's Brotherella Moss BC Endangered, (November 2010) $7,500.00
Winter 2020/2021

The report writers for all moss and lichen reports will need to:

  1. do research to discover the known distribution of the species under consideration including information available from herbaria and other applicable sources,
  2. undertake field verification work to check whether the wildlife species, as well as suitable habitat, is still present at sites from which the wildlife species had been recorded previously,
  3. check potential habitat in areas where the wildlife species may be expected,
  4. estimate, the abundance of the wildlife species at each site visited by counting colonies or thalli,
  5. include an appendix documenting the field verification work including detailed locality data on all sites visited (as well as visited sites where the wildlife species was not found)
  6. describe survey techniques, and deposit at least one voucher specimen per extant locality in a recognized public herbarium, or, in the case where collecting specimens could further endanger a population, to provide photographic evidence if this can be obtained without undue disturbance.

The value for field verifications cannot exceed one third the contract value.

Terrestrial mammals

For the three populations of bats*

1. Lasiurus cinereus 1. Hoary Bat 1. AB, BC, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK, YT New $23,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
2. Lasionycteris noctivagans 2. Silver-haired Bat 2. AB, BC, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK, YT
3. Lasiurus borealis 3. Eastern Red Bat 3. AB, BC, MB, NB, NS, NT, ON, QC, SK
*Status reports for these species will be combined into a single report that includes the Hoary Bat, Eastern Red Bat, and Silver-haired Bat. There may be ATK available to be incorporated. In addition, note that data will need compilation from complex sources.

Vascular plants

For Pumpkin Ash*

Fraxinus profunda Pumpkin Ash ON New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For California Sword Fern*

Polystichum californicum California Sword Fern BC New $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Foothill Sedge

Carex tumulicola Foothill Sedge BC Endangered (April 2008) $8,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For False Rue-anemone*

Enemion biternatum False Rue-anemone ON Threatened (May 2005) $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For White Wood Aster*

Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus) White Wood Aster ON, QC Threatened (November 2002) $12,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Macoun's Meadowfoam*

Limnanthes macounii Macoun's Meadowfoam BC Threatened (November 2004) $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

For Small-flowered Sand-verbena*

Tripterocalyx micanthus Small-flowered Sand-verbena AB, SK Endangered (November 2002) $11,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
*Field verification of populations must be undertaken for Pumpkin Ash (Fraxinus profunda), California Sword Fern (Polystichum californicum), False Rue-anemone (Enemion biternatum), White Wood Aster (Eurybia divaricata (Aster divaricatus)), Macoun's Meadowfoam (Limnanthes macounii), and Small-flowered Sand-verbena (Tripterocalyx micanthus). Note that more fieldwork would be expected for species with old or inadequate (e.g. no population count) field survey data. Potentially suitable habitats should be surveyed to the extent that is reasonable under the proposed budget limits. Successful candidates will have access to previous locality data to assist them in finding sites. Access to private properties for survey purposes requires landowner permission. Contract values include some funds for time required in determining land ownership and contacting landowners.

 

Part 3: Wildlife species for which a COSEWIC designatable unit report is needed

Experts are needed to write COSEWIC reports on the designatable units for Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and Pink Salmon (O. gorbuscha) in Canada.

Notice

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) seeks qualified individuals or small groups of individuals to undertake thorough reviews and analyses of existing information on Chum Salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and Pink Salmon (O. gorbuscha) populations in Canada. The purpose is to identify suitable designatable units (DUs) at an appropriate scale that will form the basis of a subsequent assessment of these wildlife species.

Background

COSEWIC may identify DUs below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance that are related to factors such as established taxonomy, genetic variation, range disjunction, and biogeographic distinction including regional climates. Writers must carefully consider the publication:

Holtby, L.B., and Ciruna, K.A. 2007. Conservation Units for Pacific Salmon under the Wild Salmon Policy. Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat. Research Document. 2007/070 350pp+viii.

Wildlife species for which a Designatable Units report is needed:
Scientific name Common name Range in Canada Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft.
Oncorhynchus keta Chum Salmon BC, NT, YT, Arctic Ocean, Pacific Ocean $6,000.00
Winter 2020/2021
Oncorhynchus gorbuscha Pink Salmon BC, NT, Arctic Ocean, Pacific Ocean $6,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

Description of work

COSEWIC requires reports that:

  • review existing information on the range and biological characteristics of salmon populations covered in this call for bids and possible divisions into DUs, describing ecological, morphological and genetic differences, range disjunctions, and local adaptations of possible DUs;
  • review criteria in use by COSEWIC for defining DUs and for guiding the practical division of such species into DUs that can be separately assigned status designations;
  • apply the most appropriate criteria to the distribution and characteristics of these populations in order to propose one or more divisions of the populations in Canadian waters into DUs;
  • critically review the proposed divisions, giving an accurate assessment of their strengths and weaknesses and the reasons they are preferred.

COSEWIC’s guidelines for recognizing DUs below the wildlife species level require that they meet criteria for both discreteness and evolutionary significance. It will therefore be important to enumerate and substantiate all criteria in both of these categories that support the proposed DUs.

The contractors will:

  • conduct thorough literature reviews,
  • consult with relevant experts,
  • consider any information on Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge provided by the COSEWIC ATK Subcommittee of COSEWIC (via the marine fishes species specialist subcommittee and the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittee co-chairs),
  • synthesize existing knowledge in the reports.

The report and supplementary information should be presented in a format allowing evaluation of the different options and adoption of the appropriate DU classification scheme for use in the status assessments.

The following list of relevant literature includes previous COSEWIC status reports on salmon where DUs were recognized and justified. In addition, similar exercises on, Lake Whitefish, Caribou, and Beluga conducted as COSEWIC Special Reports (Rogers 2008, COSEWIC 2011, COSEWIC In prep.) may be instructive. There is of course a great deal of other relevant literature not listed here.

Selected relevant literature

COSEWIC In prep. Draft report in preparation. Designatable Units for Beluga Whale (Delphinapterus leucas) in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. Available upon request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC In prep. COSEWIC Report on Designatable Units for Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in the Fraser River Drainage of British Columbia. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. Available upon request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC In prep. COSEWIC Report on Designatable Units for Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Southern British Columbia. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. Available upon request from the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC. 2011. Designatable Units for Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. 88 pp.

Holtby, L.B., and Ciruna, K.A. 2007. Conservation Units for Pacific Salmon under the Wild Salmon Policy. Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat. Research Document. 2007/070 350pp+viii.

Mee, J.A., L. Bernatchez, J.D. Reist, S.M. Rogers and E.B. Taylor. 2015. Identifying designatable units for intraspecific conservation prioritization: a hierarchical approach applied to the Lake Whitefish species complex (Coregonus spp.). Evolutionary Applications 8: 423-441.

Rogers, S.M. 2008. Designatable units at an appropriate scale for the Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada Special Report. 77 pp.


 

Experts are needed to write a COSEWIC report on the Designatable Units for the anadromous life-history form of Oncorhynchus mykiss (Steelhead Trout), in British Columbia and Yukon, Canada

Notice

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) seeks a qualified individual or small group of individuals to undertake a thorough review and analysis of existing information on Oncorhynchus mykiss in British Columbia and Yukon, Canada. The report will cover the anadromous life-history form (Steelhead Trout), including populations with sympatric populations of, resident Rainbow Trout and anadromous Steelhead Trout. The purpose is to identify suitable designatable units (DUs) at an appropriate scale that will form the basis of a subsequent assessment of these wildlife species.

Background

COSEWIC may identify DUs below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance that are related to factors such as established taxonomy, genetic variation, range disjunction, and biogeographic distinction including regional climates.

Wildlife species for which a Designatable Units report is needed:
Scientific name Common name Range in Canada Suggested contract value and time frame for first draft.
Oncorhynchus mykiss Steelhead Trout / Anadromous Rainbow Trout BC, YT, Pacific Ocean $20,000.00
Winter 2020/2021

Description of work

COSEWIC requires reports that identifies DUs for O. mykiss. This project will consider those watersheds with anadromous life-history forms (Steelhead Trout), and watersheds with sympatric populations of resident (Rainbow Trout) and anadromous Steelhead Trout, in British Columbia and the Yukon.

Watersheds excluded from this report are those with only:

  • Stream resident O. mykiss (fluvial)
  • Lake resident O. mykiss (adfluvial)

The report writer(s) will:

  • describe ecological, morphological and genetic differences, range disjunctions, and local adaptations of possible DUs; review criteria in use by COSEWIC for defining DUs and for guiding the practical division of such species into DUs that can be separately assigned status designations;
  • apply the most appropriate criteria to the distribution and characteristics of these populations in order to propose one or more divisions of the populations in Canadian waters into DUs; and
  • critically review the proposed divisions, giving an accurate assessment of their strengths and weaknesses and the reasons they are preferred.

COSEWIC’s guidelines for recognizing DUs below the wildlife species level require that they meet criteria for both discreteness and evolutionary significance. It will therefore be important to enumerate and substantiate all criteria in both of these categories that support the proposed DUs.

The contractors will:

  • conduct thorough literature reviews,
  • consult with relevant experts,
  • consider any information on Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge provided by the COSEWIC ATK Subcommittee of COSEWIC (via the marine fishes species specialist subcommittee and the Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge subcommittee co-chairs),
  • synthesize existing knowledge in the reports.

The report and supplementary information should be presented in a format allowing evaluation of the different options and adoption of the appropriate DU classification scheme for use in the status assessments of anadromous O. mykiss and sympatric populations of anadromous and resident forms.

The following list of relevant literature includes previous COSEWIC status reports on O. mykiss where DUs were recognized and justified (COSEWIC 2018). In addition, similar exercises on Sockeye Salmon, Lake Whitefish, and Caribou conducted as COSEWIC Special Reports (Rogers 2008, COSEWIC 2011, COSEWIC 2017) may be instructive. There is of course a great deal of other relevant literature not listed here.

Selected relevant literature

Beacham T.D., Le K.D., Candy J.R. (2004) Population structure and stock identification of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in British Columbia and the Columbia River based on microsatellite variation. In: Gharrett A.J. et al. (eds) Genetics of Subpolar Fish and Invertebrates. Developments in environmental biology of fishes, vol 23. Springer, Dordrecht (and other papers by Beacham)

Christie, M.R., M.L. Marine, and M.S. Blouin. 2011. Who are the missing parents? Grandparentage analysis identifies multiple sources of gene flow into a wild population. Molecular Ecology 20: 1263-1276.

COSEWIC. 2018. Technical Summaries and Supporting Information for Emergency Assessments: Steelhead Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Thompson and Chilcotin River populations.

COSEWIC. 2017. COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report on Sockeye Salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka): 24 Designatable Units in the Fraser River Drainage Basin in Canada.

COSEWIC. 2011. Designatable Units for Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. Ottawa. 88 pp.

Courter, I.I, D.B. Child, J.A. Hobbs, T.M. Garrison, J.J.G. Glessner, and S. Duery. 2013. Resident rainbow trout produce anadromous offspring in a large interior watershed. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 70:701-710.

Docker, M.F. and D.D. Heath. 2003. Genetic comparison between sympatric anadromous and freshwater resident rainbow trout in British Columbia, Canada. Conservation Genetics 4(2): 227-231.

Kendall, N.W., J.R. McMillan, M.R. Sloat, T.W. Buehrens, T.P. Quinn, G.R. Pess, K.V. Kuzishchin, M.M. McClure, and R.W. Zabel. 2015. Anadromy and residency in steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): a review of the processes and patterns. Can. J. Fish. Aq. Sci. 72:319-342.

Kendall, N.W., G.W. Marston, and M.M. Klungle. 2017. Declining patterns of Pacific Northwest steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) adult abundance and smolt survival in the ocean. Can. J. Fish. Aq. Sci. 74: 1275-1290.

McCusker, M.R., E.A. Parkinson, and E.B. Taylor. 2000. Phylogenetic Conservation Units for Rainbow Trout in British Columbia. Province of British Columbia, Fisheries Management Report 112.

McMillan, J.R., and S.L. Katz, and G.R. Pess. 2007. Observational evidence of spatial and temporal structure in a sympatric anadromous (Winter Steelhead) and resident rainbow trout mating system on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 136(3): 736-748.

Mee, J.A., L. Bernatchez, J.D. Reist, S.M. Rogers and E.B. Taylor. 2015. Identifying designatable units for intraspecific conservation prioritization: a hierarchical approach applied to the Lake Whitefish species complex (Coregonus spp.). Evolutionary Applications 8: 423-441.

Modesto Irrigation District v. Gutierrez 2010. United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Parkinson, E.A., E. Keeley, E.B. Taylor, S. Pollard, A.F. Tautz. 2005. A population database for defining conservation units in steelhead trout. Province of British Columbia, Fisheries Management Report No. 119.

Pearse, D.E., S.A. Hayes, M.H. Bond, C.V. Hanson, E.C. Anderson, R. B. MacFarlane, and J.C. Garza. 2009. Over the Falls? Rapid Evolution of Ecotypic Differentiation in Steelhead/ Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Journal of Heredity 100(5): 515-525.

Phillis, C.C., J.W. Moore, M. Buoro, S.A. Hayes, J.C. Garza, and D.E. Pearse. 2016. Journal of Heredity 107(1): 51-60.

Quinn, T.P. and K.W. Myers. 2004. Anadromy and the marine migrations of Pacific salmon and trout: Rounsefell revisited. Reviews in Biology and Fisheries. 14(4): 421-442.

Rogers, S.M. 2008. Designatable units at an appropriate scale for the Lake Whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Canada. Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada Special Report. 77 pp.

Rounsefell, G.A. 1958. Anadromy in North American Salmonidae. Fish. Bull. 131:171-185.

Scott, W.B. and E.J. Crossman. 1973. Freshwater Fishes of Canada. Fish. Res. Board Can. Bulletin 184.

Seamons, T.R., P. Bentzen, and T.P. Quinn. 2004. The mating system of steelhead, Oncorhynchus mykiss, inferred by molecular analysis of parents and progeny. Environmental Biology of Fishes 69: 333-344.

Tautz, A.F., S. Pollard, R.S. Hooten, R.A. Ptolemy, and E.B. Taylor. 2011. Skeena Steelhead Conservation Units. A project of the Skeena Watershed Initiative supported by the Living Rivers Fund and the Pacific Salmon Foundation. (Obtained from Greg Wilson, BC Province).


 

Part 4: Conditions of contract and instructions for submitting bids

Notice

COSEWIC seeks experts from the private or public sector to prepare a report on the status of the wildlife species listed in Part 2 or on the designatable units of the wildlife species listed in Part 3 for the Fall 2019 Call for Bids.

Background

COSEWIC assesses wildlife species (including mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, fish, arthropods, molluscs, vascular plants, mosses, and lichens) that are at risk of extinction or extirpation from Canada. Assessments are based on comprehensive wildlife species status reports on each wildlife species. Contracts are administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada via the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC may identify DUs below the species level based on criteria for discreteness and evolutionary significance that are related to factors such as established taxonomy, genetic variation, range disjunction, and biogeographic distinction including regional climates.

Description of work

The contractor will use the best available information on the wildlife species, including scientific, community, and ATK, to write a comprehensive status report that will form the basis of an assessment on the status of the wildlife species in Canada, or a designatable unit report that may lead to a status report.

The content and format of the status report will conform to the Instructions for preparing COSEWIC status reports which specifies headings, the content under each heading, range maps, other figures and appendices. The contractor will also be required to use the typographic and editorial style set out in the template for status report preparation found on the COSEWIC website. Any illustrations or graphics used must be originals prepared by the contractor or, if not, appropriate authorization for their use must be obtained and clearly cited in the report.

Beginning in 2012, COSEWIC status reports also include Threats Classification and Assessment Calculators. Writers are expected to attend related teleconferences and to assist with this process.

The contractor will actively seek out all relevant and important existing sources of scientific, community and ATK. The contractor will also contact COSEWIC representatives from jurisdictions responsible for the wildlife species, as well as relevant wildlife management boards, recovery team co-chairs (as applicable), and Conservation Data Centres to obtain the most recent information on the wildlife species. Contact information for the above agencies / organizations is provided in the required contacts for information on wildlife species.

The contractor is required to contact the COSEWIC Secretariat to obtain detailed instructions and ensure that methodologies and concepts are applied correctly and consistently in the preparation of wildlife species distribution maps and in the calculation of the extent of occurrence and index of area of occupancy. In addition, the contractor must submit to the COSEWIC Secretariat all survey data (wildlife species observation / localities, search effort), whether collected during fieldwork performed in the course of writing the status report or obtained from other sources. Every effort should be made to ensure that all data obtained can be transferred to COSEWIC by obtaining proper permissions.

Contractors should have a good understanding of COSEWIC’s assessment criteria and the definitions of terms used within the criteria before writing the report. This will allow the contractor to better describe the wildlife species’ situation in preparation for COSEWIC’s assessment. COSEWIC’s assessment criteria and definitions can be found in Table 2 and Table 6.

In 2005, COSEWIC initiated an effort to solicit community knowledge on wildlife species for which status reports are commissioned. COSEWIC may receive information on wildlife species from the Community Knowledge section of its website. Information obtained through this source, including additional contact names, will be forwarded to the contractor for consideration and incorporation into the status report.

It is the responsibility of the contractor to include ATK relevant to the wildlife species status assessment in the status report (species for which a separate ATK report is being considered are identified in Part 2). This will be facilitated through the ATK Subcommittee, which will also review any ATK gathered by the contractor. All holders of ATK contacted must be appropriately acknowledged. Contractors must contact the COSEWIC Secretariat ATK coordinator before commencing work on the status report. Contact information for the COSEWIC Secretariat ATK coordinator and more information about gathering ATK are provided in the Instructions for preparing COSEWIC status reports.

Site verification may be required for the status report. Wildlife species requiring fieldwork are identified in Part 2. Contractors verifying field sites are required to obtain permission from private landowners before accessing private land. If the fieldwork can be completed with less expense using a rental vehicle rather than a private vehicle, contractors shall rent. Expenses for meals and accommodation may be estimated using the guidelines outlined in Appendix 1 of this document. Automobile liability insurance will need to be maintained in force for the duration of the fieldwork for a limit of liability not less than $2,000,000 per accident or occurrence, in addition to physical damage insurance.

Once completed, the report will be subjected to a review process. The draft report, after receiving approval by the relevant COSEWIC species specialist subcommittee (SSC) co-chair, will be reviewed by the relevant SSC members, the ATK Subcommittee, the jurisdiction(s), relevant wildlife management boards, recovery team co-chairs (as applicable), and any other external reviewers recommended by the SSC. Comments and suggestions will be forwarded to the report writer with instructions from the SSC co-chair for changes that must be incorporated to produce the provisional report. Over the course of subsequent review and the COSEWIC assessment, further modifications may be made to the report. Following the COSEWIC assessment, a final document entitled COSEWIC Assessment and Status Report will be published on the SARA public registry and/or will be archived at the COSEWIC Secretariat.

Additional optional work to be offered to winning bidders

In addition to the preparation of the status reports, the winning bidders may be offered the task to produce a description of the wildlife species’ residence using a defined set of guidelines and following a provided template. This part of the contract will be administered separately by Environment Canada. The information gathered describing the wildlife species’ residence will be requested at the same time as the draft report. The separate document detailing the wildlife species’ residence will be for a maximum value of $600.00 over and above the contract amount suggested in the Call for Bids.

The concept of residence may not apply to all wildlife species and will not be required for aquatic species, vascular plants, or lichens. For more information about this work, the contact person is Veronique Brondex (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.).

Acknowledgment for the preparation of COSEWIC status reports

COSEWIC status reports commissioned after May 2001, are "living documents." After the report is concluded, any subsequent updates to status reports will be prepared simply by adding new information to the existing report and, where appropriate, by updating factual information. COSEWIC will be cited as the author on the cover page (ownership and copyright will rest with the Crown). Contractors who produce the initial status report or add information to the "living document" to produce an updated status report will be acknowledged as having prepared the status report. Over time, the acknowledgements will list the contributors (report writers) who have provided their expertise.

Copyright and moral rights

Environment and Climate Change Canada has determined that any intellectual property arising from the performance of the work under the contract will vest in the Crown on the grounds that the production of the report and related documents are subject to Copyright and that the report is being produced to generate knowledge and information for public dissemination.

At the request of Environment and Climate Change Canada, the contractor will provide to the Crown a written permanent waiver of Moral Rights1 from all authors of the report, in a form acceptable to Environment and Climate Change Canada.

The contractor will be granted a license to use, copy, reproduce and publish portions of the Provisional Report provided that 1) the contractor will not publish the entire provisional report, or distribute it to any third party, and 2) the contractor acknowledges that the Crown has contributed Crown copyright in the Provisional Report and includes the following notice and disclaimer in any new document which incorporates portions of the report: "Notice: Some of the information used or referenced in this document is Crown copyright, compiled on behalf of COSEWIC under a contract with Environment Canada, however, comments or conclusions made by the author using this information do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Environment and Climate Change Canada or COSEWIC."

Property rights in ATK

ATK is the property of those who hold it. Contractors will require permission for gathering ATK using appropriate consent forms to be provided. Knowledge holders will be provided with an opportunity to review and validate the factual information shared with the report writer before it is integrated into the status report. Raw information (e.g., transcripts, tapes, etc.) will be returned to the knowledge holder or the community for storage. The report writer shall not have any intellectual property rights in the knowledge provided from Aboriginal sources.

Awarding of contracts

COSEWIC aims to seek out experts who will prepare the best possible wildlife species status reports. The best expertise may reside in the public or private sector, and as such, this Call for Bids is open to both.

As per the Treasury Board Contracting Policy, applicants who work for the public service must discuss with their employer and conflict of interest group of their plans to apply and whether they plan to do the work during work time or outside of work time. Employer consent will be required before a contract is signed. There are also specific provisions within the Treasury Board Contracting Policy that pertain to former public servants in receipt of a pension or a lump sum payment.

The COSEWIC Call for Bids is a tool to advertise the need for writers of COSEWIC status reports or other reports. This Call for Bids does not guarantee that the work outlined in this document will go forward.

Value of contract

Allowable expenditures in the bid will include all professional services, fees (including applicable administrative fees), expenses including long-distance telephone calls, photocopying, courier, and travel in the course of research (including appropriate insurance for car rental or business use of private vehicle). Standard government contracting conditions will apply. Appendix 1 provides additional guidelines for estimating travel expenses for field work if applicable (see Part 2).

Schedule of deliverables and payments

Suggested timeframes to complete draft reports are provided for individual projects in Part 2. A detailed schedule of deliverables and payments is to be determined for successful candidates in discussions with SSC co-chairs. Report writers are expected to submit their deliverables promptly on or before midnight of the due dates identified in their contract. For all payments, the deliverable must first be approved as acceptable by the SSC co-chair. If a description of the wildlife species’ residence was requested (refer to Additional optional work to be offered to winning bidders), the deliverable must first be approved as acceptable by the relevant Environment and Climate Change Canada representatives before payment is issued.

Bid evaluation

Bids received will be evaluated by at least three members of the relevant COSEWIC SSC according to the following criteria:

Individuals preparing bids for COSEWIC status reports or other reports must adhere to the bid submission template (PDF) for each submission

Bids that do not conform to the format and content of the bid submission template will not be accepted by the COSEWIC Secretariat.

COSEWIC will only accept bids for single reports, except where specified otherwise in Part 2 or Part 3.

Evaluation criteria for bids
Mandatory requirements Meets
Bid must conform to the formatting and length requirements in the bid submission template. All components of the template must be completed. Yes No
The applicant must be willing to cede intellectual rights to the Crown, and be willing to waive moral rights in the report. Yes No
Rated criteria
Applicant’s total score Information and content provided is...
UNSATISFACTORY: 0-69% considered not acceptable for meeting the criteria for selection.
GOOD: 70-79% sufficient and will likely meet the specified requirements.
VERY GOOD: 80-90% more than sufficient and will more than meet the specified requirements.
EXCELLENT: 91-100% exceptional; services offered exceed the specified requirements.
Bid evaluation grid
Category Maximum score*
1. Knowledge (including academic background, knowledge of wildlife species, knowledge of how to access information relevant for a COSEWIC status report or designatable unit report, including knowledge of French and/or English as needed to understand and synthesize available information, and an understanding of the respective roles of report writers and COSEWIC in drafting reports and producing assessments). 30
2. Writing experience (prior experience with COSEWIC and other reports if applicable, evidence of ability to incorporate editorial comments and of meeting deadlines, publication record. Ability to integrate ATK if required). 40
3. Work plan and budget (showing attainment of objectives within suggested time frame, expenditure justification (including allotment of no more than one third contract value for field verifications and consideration of the suggested value of the contract from the call for bids), availability of time to write report and incorporate editorial changes. In the case of a team application, clear description of each person's task and skills.**) 30
Total 100
*For each of the three rated categories, the bidder must show evidence of ability in all of the sub-categories indicated to attain a high score for the category. Evidence of poor performance in one sub-category could lead to a very low score.
**For bidders who have submitted multiple bids, evaluators will consider the feasibility of awarding multiple contracts to the same bidder, depending on the timelines and work required for each project.

Proposals will be evaluated, and the contract awarded by the Secretariat, based on the above requirements. Evaluators will study each bidder’s proposal, consult the references submitted by the bidder, and if required consult other references knowledgeable about the bidder’s work. Bids may be accepted in whole or in part, with or without negotiation.

The bidder with the lowest cost estimate will not necessarily be accepted. The contract award will be made by the Secretariat on the basis of best overall value to COSEWIC in terms of both technical merit and cost.

Questions, bid submission and acknowledgement

Questions and bids may be submitted to the COSEWIC Secretariat at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. (should you not have access to email, you can fax your bid to 819-938-3984). Bid submissions should include the following subject line “Bid for [wildlife species name]”.

A pdf version of the bid submission template (PDF) is available on the COSEWIC website. Please print, complete, and scan the template to submit bid to the Secretariat.

For a word document of the Bid Submission Template, please contact the Secretariat.

 

Deadline: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 at 3pm Eastern time. Late bids will not be accepted.

An acknowledgement of bid receipt will be sent by the Secretariat via email (unless an alternative method is requested) to each applicant within two business days. If an acknowledgement is not received within this time, please contact the Secretariat by telephone at 819-938-4125. During the last two days of the call for bids, the Secretariat will acknowledge receipt of bids as soon as possible, and at the latest, by the end of the business day which follows last day of the competition.


 

Appendix 1: Travel rates and guidelines

The following rates and guidelines may be used as a guide when planning fieldwork-related expenses. These are the approximate maximum claim amounts (subject to minor changes twice per year) for use of personal vehicle, accommodation, meal allowances, and incidentals, although contractors are free to bill for lesser amounts. Receipts are required for certain expenses, as indicated.

Please note that for contracts involving site verifications, the total value of the site verification travel expenses should generally be limited to one-third of the contract value. Thus, except under specific circumstances, the overall budget should be designed to reflect this. It is also important for contractors to try to keep estimated costs for the field work as close as possible to what they will eventually bill.

Please note that estimated fieldwork expenses should include appropriate insurance coverage for automobile rental or business use of private vehicle (minimum $ 2 million liability, plus physical damage insurance) for the duration of the planned fieldwork. Note that automobile insurance in place for personal use will often not meet the contractor's obligation under the terms of this type of contract; therefore the contractor must obtain proper automobile insurance for use of its own vehicle when performing work under the contract or rent a vehicle with increased/extended insurance coverage.

Summary of travel expenses allowed for reimbursement

Car rental: receipt required for rental, receipts required for gas

Private vehicle (gas included) (Note that if the fieldwork can be completed with less expense using a rental vehicle rather than a private vehicle, contractors shall rent. The following rates are payable in cents per kilometre based on the province or territory of registration of the vehicle). Cents/km (taxes included)
Alberta 48.0
British Columbia 54.5
Manitoba 51.0
New Brunswick 53.5
Newfoundland and Labrador 57.5
Northwest Territories 64.5
Nova Scotia 52.5
Nunavut 61.5
Ontario 57.0
Prince Edward Island 52.0
Quebec 54.0
Saskatchewan 51.0
Yukon 63.5

Commercial accommodations: receipt required

Accommodations in a private residence: claim $50.00 (private non-commercial accommodation allowance).

Meal allowances (excluding YT, NT, NU, which are higher):

  • Breakfast: $ 20.35 (no receipt required)
  • Lunch: $ 20.60 (no receipt required)
  • Dinner: $ 50.55 (no receipt required)
  • Total per day: $ 91.50 (no receipt required)

Effective July 1, 2017, non public service travelers will no longer be reimbursed for incidental expenses.


(1) Moral rights, as defined by the Copyright Act, include a) the right of having the author's name associated with the Work, where reasonable in the circumstances; and b) the right to the integrity of the Work such as preventing the Work from being changed, corrected or amended.

About us

The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) is an independent advisory panel to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada that meets twice a year to assess the status of wildlife species at risk of extinction. Members are wildlife biology experts from academia, government, non-governmental organizations and the private sector responsible for designating wildlife species in danger of disappearing from Canada.


COSEWIC secretariat
Canadian Wildlife Service
Environment and Climate Change Canada
351 St. Joseph Blvd, 16th floor
Gatineau QC K1A 0H3

Telephone: 819-938-4125
Fax: 819-938-3984
Email: ec.cosepac-cosewic.ec@canada.ca

Latest News

COSEWIC press release: May 2019

ST. JOHN'S, May 6, 2019 /CNW/ - Canada's marine protected areas are more important than ever. The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) has just assessed three whales, including two of the world's largest, as under threat in Canadian waters.


Assessment results (May 2019 COSEWIC wildlife species assessment meeting)

Twice per year, Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) meets to discuss and evaluate the status of Canadian wildlife species. Here you will find the List of Wildlife Species scheduled for the next COSEWIC Wildlife Species Assessment Meeting, the results of wildlife species assessment meeting, and the updated COSEWIC Canadian Wildlife Species at Risk Publication.